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(updated February 13, 2014)

The flagship model in their world-famous line of high-performance blenders designed for home use, the Vitamix 5200 continues Vita-Mix Corporation’s decades-old tradition as “the” name in commercial-quality blending.  The 5200 was introduced to the United States in 2007 as a new-and-improved version of the company’s wildly popular 5000 – still to this day the world’s best-selling Vitamix.  Improved design features and an upgraded motor distinguish the latest model from its predecessor, however.  The following review is a comprehensive look at the Vitamix 5200 blender.  The information and opinions expressed in it are derived and formed from data gathered directly from the company, my ownership of both the 5000 and 5200 models and uses of each in blending operations numbering in the thousands, and my sales experience in the high-performance blender industry dating back to 2009.  It is intended solely as reference material for anyone considering the purchase of a high-performance blender.

Package and Specifications

Every Vitamix model through the 5000 was built on-site at the company’s Cleveland, Ohio, world headquarters.  Though still completely assembled in America, the 5200 includes a Swedish-designed and manufactured motor, which will be examined in greater detail below.  The entire Vitamix 5200 package consists of a motor base in the customer’s choice of color, a jar with attached blade assembly and two-part lid, tamper, first-time user guide, usage tips card, cooking class-themed DVD, warranty certificate, registration card, and recipe book.

The motor base of the 5200 is square in shape, 7 ½” wide and 9” deep, and weighs roughly 11 lbs.  With the jar and lid in place, the entire unit stands 20 1/8” tall.  A standard 120 volt, 3-pronged grounded power cord extends to a length of up to 6 feet from the underside of the base.  Any or all of the cord can be stored underneath the machine – a particularly handy feature when traveling with the unit or when operating it at short distances from electrical outlets.  The base rests on four round, rubber feet, ¾” in diameter.  The interface of the machine is on the front side of the base and consists of a panel with two levers on either side of a dial in its center.  The switches are durable, “soft-touch” rubber for improved ease of operation (one of several improvements over the 5000 model).  One is a speed control and one is for powering the machine on and off.  The “soft touch” center dial controls the variable speed feature of the machine.

The exterior of the base is made of wear-resistant plastic in the customer’s choice of white, black, red, platinum or brushed-stainless finishes.  Inside is a new Swedish-designed motor designed and manufactured specifically for the 5200.  The 11.5 amp, 1380 watt motor is advertised as 2-peak horsepower (2HP).  Though technically no stronger than that in the Vitamix 5000, the new motor is more efficient due to engineering improvements in its ability to sustainedly cool itself during operation, which translates to both energy savings and improved motor performance.  Top-end blade speed on the 5200 has been measured at 37,000 revolutions per minute (RPM).  Significant discussion and debate continues in the blender industry on what role horsepower plays with these machines as well as guidelines for calculating it. I’ve offered a layman’s overview in this article on high-performance blenders.  Vita-Mix has also issued its own statement on motor horsepower.

The majority of the improvements to the 5200 are featured on its jar and lid.  In early 2007, Vita-Mix announced a partnership with the Eastman Chemical Co. for constructing new containers for this model.  The traditional (and already strong) polycarbonate containers have now been replaced with an even more durable copolyester called Eastman Tritan™.  The new jar is not only stronger, but is also significantly more chemical and heat-resistant, is quieter during operation, and contains no Bisphenol-A (BPA) commonly found in polycarbonate.

Tapering from wide and round at its top to narrow and square-shaped at the bottom, the jar easily holds contents totaling 2+ quarts in volume.  It is marked in ounces up to 68 and cups up to 8 ½ on one side, milliliters up to 200 and liters up to 2 on the other.  Marked with a “Max” fill line at 68 oz. (8 ½ cups), the jar actually holds 80 oz. (10 cups).  A single spout at the top of the container, opposite the handle, has been redesigned for more effective pouring and is advertised as “no-drip.”   The handle, too, has been updated and now features an ergonomic design including an indented thumb-rest on its rubber “soft-grip” for more effective control over the jar.  From the bottom of the container, a 1 ½” lip fits securely in each corner of its squared design around four rubber posts that extend upward from the motor base.  Combined with the slotted blade assembly and correspondingly-fitted drive socket, the jar is exceptionally stable on the base during operation.  The drive socket, itself, is formed, hardened plastic and the 5200’s four-sided (crisscrossed), stainless steel hammermill-shaped “wet” blades spin in a single, counterclockwise direction.  Each of the blade’s four extensions are approximately 1 ¼” long.  If needed, the blade assembly is removable from the jar using a specially-designed wrench (not included) from Vita-Mix.

The 5200’s redesigned two-part lid consists of a molded-rubber cover edged with a lip which secures inside the opening of the container by resting on yet another lip formed inside the jar itself.  The newly-designed cover also features two tabs which “grab” a second lip on the outside of the jar, insuring the lid remains in place during operation.  These “easy off” tabs are loosened with a single finger when removing the lid.  A 2” by 2” hole in the center of the lid is the egress point for a tamper which is included with the 5200.  This hole also houses the second part of the lid – a removable, copolyester plug with multiple functions.  It can be removed entirely from the main lid with a simple twist, creating an opening for the addition of ingredients during operation.  When inserted, the plug also serves as the jar’s vent, allowing pressure to escape when making hot contents such as soups and syrups.  Finally, when inverted, the center of the plug is also a perfect jigger for liquid ingredients, and is actually marked at 1 and 2 oz. on one side, and 30 and 60 ml. on the other.

For grinding of whole grains and beans into flours, powdering sugar, and making bread crumbs, Vita-Mix makes a “Dry Blade” container which features a different blade design and configuration.  It is sold separately from the 5200 package.  The Vitamix Super 5200 and Vitamix Deluxe 5200 are packages which include this container, however.

Its superior performance notwithstanding, the feature that generates perhaps the greatest amount of discussion surrounding the machine is its tamper.  This is a tool designed for use during blending to direct larger or denser ingredients into the cutting path of the blade, as well as to alleviate air pockets that develop during cavitation.  Just under 13” in length, the tube-shaped, molded plastic tamper is formed with a handle and lip at its upper end which, when inserted into the container through the opening in the main lid, will prevent the bottom of the tamper from making contact with the blades.  When not in use, the tamper can store in the container.  The total height of the machine including the jar and tamper is 22 ¼”.

Getting Started is a 40-page owner’s guide containing overviews of the machine and its components, care and cleaning recommendations, tips on using the machine in several capacities as well as 20 individual recipes utilizing most of them.  Let’s Get Started! is a cooking class-themed DVD demonstrating the actual preparations of juice, soup, ice cream, and bread dough.  Emphasis is placed on order of ingredients loaded into the jar, safety when using the tamper, and operation of the machine’s control dial and levers.  Instruction is also given on chopping and grinding of both wet and dry ingredients and, finally, on how to clean the machine.  The format gives the user options to skip to specific demonstrations or watch the DVD uninterrupted from its beginning.

The recipe book included with the 5200 is entitled Whole Food Recipes and is designed as a loose-leaf binder with a creased cover.  When folded at its crease, the cover functions as an easel allowing for easy countertop page-turning and viewing of individual recipes.   Color-coded and labeled dividers separate the book’s 250 recipes into categories including Beverages, Soups, Dips & Spreads, Sauces, Breads, Breakfast, Deserts, Dressings & Marinades, and Recipes for Kids.  There are also several blank pages for entries of personal recipes.  Each recipe includes ingredient content, yield, nutritional data, preparation and processing time, and numbered, step-by-step user instructions.

A 14-page owner’s manual covers machine safeguards, registration information, a breakdown of the machine’s individual parts, usage tips, special features, and care and cleaning instructions.  Completing the Vitamix 5200 package is a Quick Tips card, registration card, warranty certificate, and bonus offers.  Like the recipes themselves, the owner’s manual and Getting Started guide are punched with loose-leaf openings and can be kept in the Whole Food Recipes binder for safekeeping.

Operation

To operate a Vitamix 5200, the user must become familiar with the functions of just two levers and one dial, all located on the center interface panel of the motor base.  The lever to the right of the dial is used solely for powering the machine on and off.  In the up (On) position the machine will run.  In the down (Off) position it will not.  To the left of the dial is a lever that initiates either of the two speed settings for the machine.  If the machine is powered on and this lever is in the up position (High) it will run at its highest speed (240 miles per hour at the blade’s tips), uninterrupted, until the user either toggles the switch to the down position or uses the power lever to turn the machine off.  In the lower position (Variable), this same switch allows the machine to run at any individual speed other than its highest.  The exact speed is then selected using a rotating dial in the center of the interface.  The interface panel is numbered 1 through 10 along the dial’s circumference, with 1 representing the lowest speed.

The majority of blending operations with the 5200 will involve the use of both levers as well as the dial.  The High setting performs the majority of the blending, but it is recommended that the user “work” his way to that setting rather than by simply starting there.  Generally, the machine should always start in the Variable speed setting with the dial on speed 1.  Once the machine starts, the user should move the dial to its highest variable setting, speed 10, just prior to switching to High with the speed lever.  From this point the user only need concern himself with how long the machine runs on High.  This is the preferred procedure required to make most whole juices, smoothies, soups, syrups and ice creams, and, with very little practice, is a simple process to master.

Loading ingredients into the jar with the softest, most liquid ingredients first, and solid and/or frozen ingredients last will also significantly improve results and shorten blending times.  The design of the 5200’s container and blades create a vortex using liquids to draw ingredients loaded higher into the jar downward into the cutting path of the blades.  Each recipe in the Whole Food Recipes book suggests the “liquids low/solids high” method of loading the container, and lists the ingredients on the page in the order in which they should be loaded.  It is a simple concept that will become easily ingrained into the user’s blending routine, whether using the recipe book or not, with minimal practice.

The more diligently this loading procedure is followed, the less often the use of the tamper that comes with the 5200 will be required.  In my personal experience with the Vitamix, I have used the tamper in fewer than half of the recipes I’ve created with it, and I have also spoken to hundreds of 5200 owners who claim to never use it.  That said, when the use of the tamper is required, it is imperative that it be used only with the lid on the jar and only through the hole created in the lid via the removal of the plug.  This insures that the tamper never reaches the blade.  It is only a question of when, not if, the user will need to replace the tamper (not to mention ruin his smoothie) if a practice of using it without the lid in place is made.

Cavitation is a common occurrence in all blenders – the Vitamix 5200 included – by which an air pocket develops around its blades during blending.  A combination of high blade speeds and thick, fibrous ingredients can create such an occurrence as can extremely cold temperatures resulting from frozen foods or ice.  The greatest benefit of the tamper is in its effectiveness against cavitation.  By constantly alleviating air pockets as necessary during a blending procedure, the tamper perpetually assists the machine in its performance.  In general, the user will find the greatest need for the tamper when using large quantities of frozen ingredients in smoothies and ice creams, or when performing wet grinding procedures such as making peanut butter out of roasted peanuts.

Different, yet equally simple, blending techniques also allow the 5200 to be used for everything from a food processor to a churn.  For example, starting the machine with an empty jar on one of the lower variable speed settings and then dropping solid, fibrous ingredients like carrots, nuts, or cheese through the opening in the lid allows the user to create finely diced results to specific coarseness levels without becoming thoroughly pulverized.

After most blending operations, cleaning the container of the 5200 is a simple procedure.  Simply filling the container approximately halfway (4 cups), adding a small amount of liquid dishwashing detergent, and running the machine on the High setting for 30 seconds to 1 minute is all that’s required.  It is possible to hand wash the jar as well, but attention must be paid to the blades as they are relatively sharp.  It is recommended that the container not be cleaned in dishwashers.

Performance

The power and versatility of the Vitamix 5200 is nothing short of remarkable, and is apparent in several unique practical applications.  As one would expect, dense, fibrous fruits and vegetables are easily transformed into perfectly smooth juices and smoothies.  Equally if not more important than the created textures of these beverages, though, are the added health benefits derived from making them in this machine.  The 5200 is one of a select few blenders on the market today designed for home use that is strong enough to micronize raw, whole fruits and vegetables during the blending process.  This results in a maximum nutritional value of whole foods being made readily available to the user in the form of whole juices and smoothies.  In short, phytonutrients contained in the pulp, fiber, skins, seeds, and cores of fruits and vegetables that would otherwise remain trapped (and digested unutilized) within the food’s cellular structure if simply eaten or processed in less powerful blenders are “unlocked” via the 5200’s power and blade design.  This feature is of huge importance to most buyers of high-performance blenders like the 5200, and is explained in further detail in this article.

The 5200’s power and design also makes it significantly more diverse than any standard blender.  Extended blending times on the High setting generate exceptional blade speeds which, along with a given set of ingredients, creates enough friction within the jar, itself, to cook ingredients into soups, syrups, fondues, etc.  Temperatures are determined solely by the length of the blending process.  There is no heating element in the machine.  Raw, fresh vegetables and room-temperature water become hot soup in as little as three minutes.

Using frozen ingredients and much shorter blending times, ice creams and sorbets can also be created with the 5200.  Textures and temperatures for recipes of all kinds are determined simply by how much friction the user allows to be introduced to ingredient contents.  The recipe book is a great source with which to become familiar with these blending times, as it provides detailed, step-by-step instructions on all the machine’s functions.  Experience is perhaps the best teacher, though, and intimate knowledge of the 5200’s “secrets” to great results is easily attained with a little practice.  The user will become familiar with the way particular ingredient combinations look during blending as indications of recipe completion.  Also easily learned will be various motor pitches and sounds during blending, signifying various stages of the blending process.

Users will quickly discover there is very little in terms of ingredient content that the 5200 is not capable of processing.  Should its limits be tested, however, the machine is equipped with automatic overload protection which will engage when the motor has reached an internal temperature at which continued blending might damage its components.  The motor will simply shut itself down if it is being tested beyond its safe operating capabilities.  In thousands of blending operations with my Vitamix machines, only once have I ever personally witnessed this function at work.  During the making of peanut butter, prolonged blending thickened my mixture to the point where excessive strain was created upon the motor, and the machine halted.  Resetting was as simple as unplugging the blender and allowing the motor to cool itself for about an hour.  It is worth noting that had I stopped blending once the peanut butter initially reached a smooth texture, this would not have been an issue, and I’ve made peanut and almond butters successfully in my Vitamix machines several times since.  I have personally never once damaged the container, blades, nor blade assembly in the lifetimes of my machines.  I have purchased numerous tampers, however.  Each time this has been necessitated because of user error – i.e. using the tamper without the lid in place.  As mentioned above, proper use of the machine should eliminate the risk of this ever happening.

Performance Issues

No blender is without its limitations, though, and my single experience with the Vitamix’s overload protection is not unique.  I have spoken to numerous owners of the machine who have reported similar experiences with the machine stopping itself under excessive load.  I’m of the opinion that this in and of itself should not be considered a wholly negative phenomenon.  The power of the machine is undeniable and is readily apparent during use.  If the motor finds itself under such duress that it needs to halt rather than burn itself out, I deem it a small inconvenience in relation to purchasing a new machine – an ordeal most owners of lesser blenders have all experienced at one time or another.  Though I have no personal experience with Vitamix customer service in terms of utilizing warranty coverage (a testament to the machines’ quality), I have been informed on multiple occasions of their superior service in regards to repair and replacement of motors rendered inoperable due to normal use.  A little online due diligence on the warranty on the Vitamix 5200 reveals an unparalleled customer service experience, and, based on my actual conversations with owners of the machine, I have no doubts whatsoever that theirs is amongst the best in the business.

Standard installation height of upper kitchen cabinets is customarily 17” to 18” above countertop surfaces.  At just over 20” tall with the container on the motor base, the 5200 is too tall to store underneath most cabinets.  This is a definite drawback given my kitchen’s layout.  I store my machine after each use.

The tamper is invaluable in manipulating larger ingredients into the cutting path of the blades as well as eliminating air pockets created during blending due to cavitation.  Users will quickly discover it is not necessary for the majority of the 5200’s functions.  When it is needed, however, it is the only tool that will assist in the proper incorporation of certain ingredient combinations.  In other words, it must be used for certain recipes to be made properly.  Personally, with the exceptions of those brief periods when I’ve been without my tamper due to user-negligence (referenced above), I’ve never considered the necessity of the tamper to be a negative.  Customer feedback indicates to me, though, that the requirement of a tamper will be a less than desirable feature of the model to some.

Finally, users of the 5200 will have to resign themselves to the fact that the machine is loud when in use.  Acoustics of individual kitchens and ingredient content and volume in the jar will of course affect the particular noise levels during any given blending operation, but, in general, the machine is louder than a much lesser-quality blender.  Given the superior power of the 5200 to other blenders, this should not come as a complete surprise.  Also worth noting is that the improved jar design of the 5200 over the previous model results in a noticeable reduction in noise in my personal experience.

Summary

As mentioned above, Vitamix has been the de facto name in the high-performance blender market for approaching 80 years.  You will find their machines with the same (or inferior) motors as the 5200 in bars, restaurants, and culinary schools across the country.  Competition does exist, however.  There are other blenders with comparable motor strengths, functionality, and ease of use on the market today.  All of them, though, use the Vitamix standard as their benchmark.  In fact, during my tenure in this business I’ve yet to meet a wholly unsatisfied customer of one of their products.  I have, however, met several second and third-generation owners of the very same Vitamix machine – it having been passed down from one family member to the next.  They are built to last.  The quality of this American-made brand is unsurpassed.  And, as the 5200 model represents not only the best of Vitamix craftsmanship found in earlier models, but also incorporates several newly-discovered technological advances, there is no reason to believe that many, many 5200s, too, will not be found in the kitchens of multiple generations to come.

Please use the comments section of this page to provide your own input on or experiences with the Vitamix 5200, to ask questions about it, or for clarification on anything you read in this review.  It is my goal to assist you in any way I can in selecting the best high-performance blender for your personal needs.

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467 responses so far. Feel free to discuss it right here...

  1. Susan says:

    I’m trying to decide between replacing my 5200 with another similar model – or one of the under counter models. someone said the under counter models do not work as well as the 5200 or C Series. I’d like your input on this!
    Thanks

    • bd bd says:

      Susan, when you say “under counter” I am going to assume you mean the Next Generation models, which are designed to fit underneath most upper kitchen cabinets. Some commercial models are designed for in-counter installation but I don’t get the feeling you’re asking about those. The Next Generation models are awesome blenders. I would suggest that they perform every bit as well as any C-Series model, including the 5200. The only possible caveat would be in the case of exceptionally small recipes – those with a total volume of 6 ounces or less, for example. In these cases the traditional 64-ounce container may allow for slightly easier ingredient incorporation as it is narrower at its base than the Next Generation 64-ounce container. This would allow the smaller ingredient volume to extend closer to the actual blade assembly, which would in turn allow for slightly more efficient blending. Other than this specific instance, however, I don”t think you would go wrong with either type of model.

  2. Cheryl says:

    Hi BD. Thanks for your comprehensive, exhaustive research on the Vitamix! I didn’t think we could afford one, but really wanted one, and after reading through all of your information decided we could afford a reconditioned one. Yay! My question is, I’d really like the 5200, but I see that the standard reconditioned could be one of several different blenders and while the motors would be the same some wouldn’t have the variable speed control which is a feature I’d really like. Would selecting a certain color give me a better chance of getting a 5200? I’d prefer blue, but will choose whatever color would give me the best chance. And is the variable speed control feature really something I should be worrying about anyway? I’ll be using the Vitamix mainly for fruit and green smoothies, juice, almond milk, peanut butter, fruit sorbets and to puree batches of soup from a pot. I have a stand mixer for bread and haven’t gotten into grinding my own grains yet. Thanks in advance for your input! Cheryl

    • bd bd says:

      Cheryl, first, congratulations on not giving up on your hopes of getting a Vitamix based on price, alone. You won’t be disappointed in the reconditioned Vitamix. You are correct in that a specific original traditional (now called the C-Series) model cannot be requested with the Certified Reconditioned Standard. However, the good news for you is that all of the potential blenders that fall into this category will come with a Variable speed dial. Those that come without the Variable dial fall into a completely different reconditioned model. I do the majority of my blending on the High settings regardless of the blender I’m using, but I also find plenty of use for the Variable dial.

      If you wanted to spend even more time researching which original model you might get based on color selection, you would have to go through each individual C-Series model and view the available colors for each. This would narrow things down considerably. I can all but assure you that you will not receive a 5200 if you select the Blue/Willow color, as this is not available as an option for the new 5200 models. Based on my experience, your chances of getting a 5200 are greater with White. But please understand that there are no guarantees of this, so I hesitate to even mention it. Again, Vitamix will not honor requests for specific original models. But as long as you understand that the quality of the entire blender, from motor to container to accessories, is identical with any of the Certified Reconditioned Standard units you might receive, you can feel confident you are getting an equally excellent value as anyone else who orders one.

      • Cheryl says:

        Thank you so much for your response! White is my second choice so I’ll select that and hope for the best. Glad to know they are all variable speed dials in that standard series though. I misunderstood that. I’m sure I’ll be back to check for more info on your site once I receive it and start using it! Cheryl

  3. Indi says:

    Hi I have just purchased VM5200 item 010296 . At the demonstration they used the model 750 holds pre-programmed . I thought this was just a timer I also grind my dry spices in small qualities freshly as required the sales representative refused to grind further cinnamon which he had on display. So as the container on the 750 is large i was suspicious as to if it meet my requirements. So I purchased the VM5200 and now I am having slight regrets & have approached customer services to see if exchanged is possible. I also was given wet jar 015130 free and purchased 015129 Dry jar for dry grinding.I have viewed reviews on 750 and remain alarmed at the recall. What would be your advise I am based In UK

    • bd bd says:

      Indi, the recall should be a non-issue for you, as any machine sold after August 2013 will contain the new, improved blade assembly and will therefore not be subjected to the recall. If you were given a free 32-ounce container and have a 32-ounce dry container, then you have assembled a quite nice Vitamix package capable of performing every possible blending task. Depending on the hardness of your spices, either the Dry Grains or 32-ounce standard container will be perfectly suitable for grinding.

      The pre-programmed settings on the Professional Series 750 are very nice, indeed. But your 5200 is able to produce equally excellent results. What should determine your final decision will be which is more important to you – the free container with the 5200, or the pre-programmed settings plus larger container with the Pro 750.

  4. shelly says:

    Hi I have a question regarding the heat factor in the vitamix. When whole grains are ground into flour they should be done so in a manner that does not heat them up to prevent oxidation and preserve nutritional value. How does the vitamix work in relation to this? I own a vitamix 5200 but am considering buying a grain mill and am wondering about the differences between the two regarding this.

    • bd bd says:

      Shelly, I am not an expert miller but in general you are correct in that heat can be just as damaging to the nutritional value of grains as that of smoothies and the like. Other than some of the slow-crank, manually-operated mills, all of them generate heat to some extent. I can’t tell you which mills are best at combating this but I know that the friction generated by milling with a Vitamix can be manipulated by implementing a few fairly well-known techniques. First, you can grind in steps, usually no longer than 30-second intervals, allowing grains to cool substantially in-between being subjected to friction. Another trick is to freeze grains for several hours or overnight prior to being milled. This seems to help quite a bit, too.

  5. ASanghvi says:

    Question is about 6300 model. There are many questions around differences between 5200 and 6300 and whether worth the difference. On difference is presets on 6300. On road show I have heard that these presets are not just predefined timing timers but sensors based (viscosity, temperature, etc) intelligent timers. So, the cycle (completion) time on same preset can vary based on these sensors. Is this correct? If it is just the predefined timing then it would be easier to do the same on 5200. Thanks.

    • bd bd says:

      A., unfortunately what you were told at the demonstration was a bit of an unscrupulous sales tactic, as the 6300 is the sole model that particular demonstrator is being commissioned to sell. The settings mentioned are designed to run at pre-determined speeds and durations regardless of ingredient makeup or temperature. Therefore, yes, the cycle can be duplicated manually on other models such as the 5200.

      There are some Vitamix blenders such as the Next Generation models which have sensors that self-regulate to a certain extent based on load detection. But this is primarily a default to operate on the High setting as the user approaches that point him/herself with the Variable speed control. In no Vitamix model is any regulation performed based on temperature. None have built-in thermometers.

      • Matt says:

        BD., With technical information it is for miscommunication to happen and not necessarily an unscruplous sales tactic. Unfortunatley not every salesperson can speek geek well. There are some partial truths in both statements. The 6300 does have a load bearing/resistance sensor called a hall effect sensor. The hall effect sensor measurses resistance (a heavier load) on the motor. The machine uses this information to increase power as necessary to stay at a stable RPM. This process is different from the 5200. When the 5200 is put on speed 4 it has a fixed amount of power. When the 6300 is put on speed 4 it has a vairable amount of power depending on the load. The variable power allows the machine to compensate for different loads during the same time setting producing more consistent textures across various types of food. Both machines are capable of producing identical results. The benefits of owning a timed Vitamix are convenience and consistency as even the best of us will blend things slightly different each time. For families, it has the benefit of anyone being able to use it and achieve the same results.

        Respectfully,

        A long-time Vitamix Demonstrator who speaks geek.

        • bd bd says:

          Matt, I very much appreciate your input. Unfortunately it appears that you and I are recipients of conflicting information. These sensors you’ve referenced have been discussed at various lengths across the site ever since the introduction of the Next Generation models. As you know the Next Gens are equipped with sensors similar to those found in many of Vitamix’s commercial models which work precisely as you’ve described. I have been assured by both the Residential and Commercial divisions at Vitamix that they are not present in the 6300, Pro 500, nor any other model in the Home line of Vitamix models, however.

  6. Russ Shettle says:

    BD,

    Is there really an issues with running the blender at speeds less than high? I like to work some of the air out of my smoothies by running a much slower speed for about 15 seconds. I don’t believe I’m hurting anything. But what’s the issue anyway.

    Vitamix seems to want you to run it full high speed all the time after an initial speed-up using the variable control.

    They make is sound like using speeds other than high is going to harm the motor in some way. I use slower speeds speeds but only for a short spell and when it’s not too viscous (thick).

    Am I harming the system? What’s the real story?

    • bd bd says:

      Russ, optimal implementation of the motor is at the highest speeds. However, this is most important when your ingredients are whole, when the load and resistance offered by them are at their greatest. As the resistance lessens over the duration of the blend it becomes less imperative that the highest speeds be maintained, although still recommended. Your trick of eliminating air via running the blender on low speeds for 15 to 20 seconds is very effective. But you are only doing this after the “real” work has been performed. There is almost no resistance being offered, and you are therefore doing no harm to your blender.

  7. Sarah says:

    I have had a Vitamix for over 10 years, and I love it. However, lately it is making a high-pitched screeching noise when blending extra-thick smoothies. Any ideas what is behind this symptom – and how I might fix it?

    • bd bd says:

      Sarah, I’m sorry for the trouble you’re having with the Vitamix. A sound like that could really be just about anything – a bearing problem, motor problem, or even a friction problem with the blade assembly. My only helpful suggestion is going to be to call Vitamix and describe to them in detail what is happening to the best of your ability. They might be able to diagnose and solve your problem for less than the cost of a new blender. If the problem isn’t major, this could be well worth it. Good luck to you.

  8. Ginger Lang says:

    Your comments are so helpful. Last week I bought a 6300 at Costco and opened the box today. I was surprised at how unstable the blender jar/blade combo is when sitting on the base. I could easily knock it over when full. Am I doing something wrong? I read that the jar is stable when blending, but what about when the motor is off? I put everything back in the box without trying it because of what appears to be the potential for toppling a full and possibly hot container of product. What is your experience, please?

    • bd bd says:

      Ginger, as long as the drive shaft on the underside of the container fits securely inside the drive socket on the motor base, the container should be sufficiently stable. Of course, it will always be prone to user-inflicted accidents, I suppose. I can only tell you that I’ve never once knocked the container off of the base. As a habit I always keep a free hand on top of the blender at startup. Once the blender is running there is almost never a reason to have to secure it manually. The exception to this is when using the tamper. When I do so, I always keep my free hand on the container. This aids in security but also leverage by which to implement the tool.

  9. Russ Shettle says:

    BD,

    The Drive Socket. I know how to remove and reinstall one of these should it become damaged or reamed out. On my new 5200 I can wiggle the socket a little bit. I could try and tighten it but is there even any need to do so? Is it supposed to be slightly loose? Myself, I think it was designed to allow for centering when coupled to the container’s spline and blade assembly. I just want to know what you think…

    Russ

    • bd bd says:

      Russ, this “wiggle” is perfectly normal and by design. No need to make adjustments.

      • Russ Shettle says:

        Thanks BD, I did read that elsewhere on the Vitamix site and it makes perfect mechanical sense.

        It is an easy to replace, inexpensive part which is meant to wear and/or break to protect itself from further serious damage should the user abuse or operate the unit improperly.

        The slight looseness of the socket works in conjunction with the container centering tabs on the rubber pad.

        I sent a message to Vitamix requesting the ability to purchase one and keep it on hand just in case.

  10. Russ Shettle says:

    Just got my 5200 a few days ago. It runs fine, made several fruit and vegie smoothies so far. Got two questions: 1. Are there any issues you know of regarding the “hardness” of ice? My freezer is kind of low. Ice Cream is hard to spoon out because of the low temp. The Ice Cubes it makes feel like hard rocks. When I add Ice the sound of it is awful but manages to break it up anyway. Will hard ice potentially bend a blade?
    Question 2: Cleaning? Should I avoid getting the bottom wet where the bearing is?

    • bd bd says:

      Russ, the 5200 should handle ice of any density with relative ease, despite the sound. If anything were to happen to a blade over the course of normal blending, it would be covered under warranty.

      Getting the underside of the container wet should cause no harm provided you dry it really well. I would avoid submerging the entire container, however. Although it is likely that even doing this would cause no ill-effects, there is certainly nothing positive that can result from this.

      • Russ Shettle says:

        Thanks for the quick reply BD.

        I would not think of submerging the container for any reason even though the cartridge bearing is sealed and exposed. These Vitamix containers use a very high precision sealed bearing assembly. I know that from my maintenance background. It would have to due to the high RPM. I was just wondering what you thought.

        The reason I asked about the hardness of ice cubes: One of the flat blade ends appears to be slightly bent downward but very slight. I know that stainless steel is very hard and it would take a lot of pressure to actually bend a blade as thick as they are in these containers. Maybe the slight bend as opposed to the opposite flat side is the way it was designed to create the turbulence.

        Regardless, I made a smoothie this morning and it still blends just fine. There is no apparent difference in performance or sound after blending a milkshake that included these rock-hard ice cubes. It was the first time I used ice. Also, I never took notice of the blade configuration until after that.

        I hear what you say but I feel like I should break up the ice a little bit before adding them in.

        • bd bd says:

          Russ, of the four prongs on the Vitamix blade, one of them does angle downward, a few degrees below parallel, by design. The angle is constant from the center of the blade assembly out to the tip of the prong. If, though, you are suggesting that just the tip/end of one of your prongs is bent, this is indicative of damage, and Vitamix will replace your blade assembly for you if you so desire.

  11. Gloria says:

    I am trying to decide which Vitamix to purchase. Your website is really great! What is the difference between the 5200, Vitamix TurboBlend S and the Total Nutrition Centre?

    • bd bd says:

      Gloria, I believe you are referring to the TurboBlend 2. This is a 2-speed Vitamix with a high and low setting, but no Variable speed dial. It contains the same motor and container as the other two models, but offers no ability to use the full range of the Vitamix motor speeds. The 5200 and Total Nutrition Center are identical models. One is marketed in the U.S. (5200), the other in Canada (TNC).

      • Gloria says:

        Thanks for your response. I was thinking of the TurboBlend VS, not the TurboBlend 2. Is that better than the 5200, if I would like to grind nuts and seeds?

        • bd bd says:

          Gloria, the TurboBlend VS is the exact same actual blender as the 5200. There is no difference in the abilities of these two models to grind nuts and/or seeds. They will both do a fantastic job. The only differences in these models is the container on the TurboBlend VS does not come with an ergonomic soft-grip handle. It is also available only in Black but does come with an extra filtration bag. The container on the 5200 comes with an ergonomic soft-grip handle and is available in a variety of motor base finishes.

  12. Patrocoa says:

    I would like your opinion as to which is really better–variable speed or the high low model. The reason I ask is that I have the TSV from 2/16/2014 on QVC on check hold. I was not 100% sure of the difference in performance, if there actually is one. Thanks bunches :-)

    • bd bd says:

      Patrocoa, both blenders have the exact same motor and use the exact same containers. Given this, I would prefer to have the model with the Variable speed dial. It delivers the same power but with more versatility.

  13. Snowbear says:

    Hi,

    I wonder whats the difference between variable 10 and high 10, is the high just for speed 10? I.e i just flip to high when the dial is on 10, does it make a difference betwween variable 5 and high 5? Does the high 10 on 5200 equals to high on other model like 6300? Is there a way to do pulse on 5200 ? Since some model replace variable / high to pulse, does the 1-9 on 6300 run the same as varable 1-9 on 5200? Its so confusing

    • bd bd says:

      Snowbear, on the 5200 the High setting is a significantly highers speed than simply Speed 10 on the Variable dial. Once you have toggled to the High position, the Variable speeds are overridden. You could then turn the Variable speed dial and it wouldn’t affect the speed at all. On the 6300, however, Speed 10 on the Variable dial equates to High on the 5200. The speeds on these two models are slightly different as they work their way down to Speed 1. However, it isn’t a major difference and is unlikely to affect any recipe you may be making to any extent at all. The majority of your blending will be done of the very highest speeds regardless of which model you use. Don’t allow yourself to be intimidated or confused by the slight differences in speed designations.

      To pulse using the 5200, simply toggle the Power On/Off switch up and down. The machine will start and stop at either the High speed or any speed at which you have the Variable dial set.

      • Snowbear says:

        Hello BD, I ordered the 6300 reconditioned couple of days ago, it still not shipped yet, i wonder how long will takes for vitamix to process the order? I’m thinking to order a dry container and filtration bag too, will they ship them together with blender or separate? Will they accept international credit card? How does phone order works?do i give payment info on the phone? My shipping address is in U.S. Thanks.

        • bd bd says:

          Snowbear, in my experience, order processing can take anywhere from 1 day to 10 depending on how busy Vitamix is at them moment as well as inventory on hand. If you would like the additional accessories shipped along with your blender, this might be possible, but you would have to speak to an account representative. I have sent you a contact of mine at Vitamix who can not only help you with the order, but also answer all your additional questions as well. Please check your email.

  14. Rachel says:

    My husband and I are the new proud owners of a Vitamix 5200. In our first trial run making mango ice cream, while working the tamper, I accidentally partially lifted the container off the base while the motor was running on about setting 6 or 7. The machine made a screeching noise, to which I reacted by pulling the container entirely off the base. We turned the motor off, placed the container back on the base and continued with our project. We do not see any visible signs of damage and the ice cream turned out great. However, I know the warnings specifically state not to remove the container while the motor is running. And I understand that doing so will wear down the teeth. Could this single action have done permanent damage? Or this type of damage more likely to occur when the container is repeatedly removed from a running motor? Thanks in advance for your insight!

    • bd bd says:

      Rachel, your container should be perfectly fine. I have inadvertently done this on multiple occasions in the past with all my blenders. Yes, repeated action involving removing the container from the motor base while running can and will take its toll on the grooves of the container’s drive shaft, but it is highly unlikely that a single occurrence will have any ill-effects. If you have inspected the drive shaft and cannot discern any noticeable damage, there likely is none. Keep on blending!

      • Rachel says:

        Thanks so much for your response. I’m glad to know I’m not the only one that’s done this. I will continue creating with a little less paranoia and perhaps a looser, less white-knuckled grip on the container. Thanks again for the peace of mind!

  15. satish menon says:

    I am based out of India and we have a 220 volt AC main power supply. Would you have a product that will function on this power supply? And can to ship it to my daughter in the US?

    • bd bd says:

      Satish, Vitamix does make models that run on 220v, but you would have to inquire with an authorized dealer in India. You can find contact information for dealers in the Vitamix FAQ section of this website. Vitamix does not make any 220v models available for delivery in the U.S., however.

  16. amjad says:

    Hi, i bought vitamix 5200 model vm1030 and i took it with me to jordan
    i the voltage here is 220-240v
    and i need a voltage converter but i don’t know how many watts the converter must be to turn it safe
    thanks :)

    • bd bd says:

      Amjad, your step-up transformer/converter should be rated for at least 2000 watts I would imagine. My best advice for you is to consult an electrician before doing this. You run some risk in encountering not only some performance issues with the blender, but also permanent damage. Also, using a converter will violate the terms of your Vitamix warranty. Keep this in mind.

      • Snowbear says:

        How can they tell if it has been used transformer?

        • bd bd says:

          Snowbear, I am not certain that they can. However, if such damage has been done to the motor which could only occur as a result of using it with a converter/transformer, it is likely that factory engineers could recognize this which could jeopardize your warranty.

  17. Stephanie says:

    Hi, I have a vitamix professional series. I am having a problem with my smoothies having a burnt taste. I have had the unit for about a year and have used it maybe 10-15 times just for smoothies so far. I dont remember the first few I made having this burnt taste to them, but the last 6 or so I tried all have the burnt taste. The machine does not have a burnt smell, just the product I make. I use some frozen fruits some not and water or milk to thin it out but everyone I make has this burnt taste. Any idea’s as to what my problem could be?

    • bd bd says:

      Stephanie, I am only speculating as this is not a common issue – but I suspect your container has an issue with either its blade assembly or gasket. Something is either misaligned or faulty, and the burnt smell/flavor is most likely the result of friction created by parts not functioning properly. The ingredients you are using should not be related in any way to the problem. I recommend you stop using the container and contact Vitamix. If your machine is still under warranty I feel certain they will address the issue to your satisfaction. Please keep us updated.

  18. Jessica says:

    I am a newbie at this whole Vitamix frenzy :)
    I am wanting to purchase one but I have no idea which would be best; id like to make smoothies, soups and juice just basic items.

    can you help point me I the right direction? any input is greatly appreciated.

    thanks,
    Jessica

    • bd bd says:

      Jessica, it can certainly seem like an overwhelming experience – at least at first. I would start by telling you that you cannot make a poor choice. Any Vitamix model you select will be an awesome blender and perfect for all of the tasks you listed: smoothies, soups, and whole juices. What you must decide between are factors like cost, size, accessories, and other “bells and whistles” such as pre-programmed settings. If you haven’t read it yet, I advise starting with this Vitamix model comparison guide I put together. It includes charts which will hopefully help you make some distinction amongst all the models: Vitamix Model Comparison Guide

      Feel free to contact me directly with any specific questions you might have as you go about making a decision.

  19. Steve Masten says:

    My wife and I recently purchased a Vitamix 300 Professional for ourselves. I have two questions:

    1. When running, the motor speed pulses up and down about every half second — rrRRrr rrRRrr rrRRrr rrRRrr. It does this under load, e.g., when making a smoothie or when washing with water, and at all speeds, but not if run when empty. Is this normal?

    2. When I turn the blender on, there is a momentary (split second) pause before the motor actually starts. Normal?

    Thanks,

    Steve

    • bd bd says:

      Steve, no, that is not normal on either count. I’m not certain what is happening but I would be surprised if the same thing wasn’t responsible for both issues. Depending on how recently you purchased the machine, I would make arrangements for either exchange or warranty service.

  20. elvira says:

    We bought Vitamix 5200 from Costco on December 2013. And we love it, the only reason for us to have it was making fresh veggies soups since my husband hate all his life vegetables (raw or cooked). I have problems with acid all my life, I am taking prevaced around 25 years and that one tablet solved the problem. But since I started to eat those soups every other day, I started to have slight noshes almost after each meal, we started to eat those soups not that often- was better, but last week I ate 2 days soup broccoli with cheese – delicious, I did not feel noshes immediately, but in a few hours, it continue for 2 days until I vomited all my soups. Maybe it has nothing to do with my soups, and I just have to go to doctor, but my husband thinks it is because (people told) that soups from vitamix 5200 is loosing all fibers, because machine is very power, And I read: ‘The vitamix engine is so powerful, that the high speed of the blades may actually destroy some of the nutrition/enzymes in the fruits/vegetables. The Vitamix liquefies vegetables, which is grate for making wonderful smoothies and sneaking greens. However, the body processes liquid foods different from solids. Chewing begins the process of digestion, and promotes THE RELEASE OF STOMACH ACID to help with the digestion. This step is not present when your fruits and veggies are in liquid form. Hence, the digestion of your liquid super food may not be optimal. For many of us and our kids, however, the choice is maybe: DRINK THE VEGGIES OR NOT GET THEM AT ALL! In which case drinking them is still a better option…’
    Maybe it is not in my case??? Maybe you can find my mistakes when making those soups? And I still would like to have those soups: I think my problem, because of cheese and milk products, which are not good for my stomach, but I do not see recepies without milk products, even when I use chicken broth I have to add cream or milk, cheese, which I think are killing me. One more thing: When recepies say, for exemple, wait 4 min. and/or until I see steam – it takes 7-8min to see steam, maybe I overcooked them? What should I do? Please give me hint. Thanks for reading!

    • bd bd says:

      Elvira, first let me say I am very sorry for the discomfort your are experiencing at mealtime. I can certainly understand why you would be eager to find out what is going on – nobody should have to fear changing their diet for the better. That said, the majority of what you are asking me constitutes medical advice, and I am not comfortable offering such. I don’t give it on my site for the simple reason that I’m not qualified to do so.

      How much, if any, fiber is lost in the blending process is debatable. However, ingesting healthy foods in any form wouldn’t seem to be a legitimate cause for illness. One might experience some occasional discomfort in the form of gas as his or her body adjusts to an influx of fresh produce into the diet, perhaps. But doing so shouldn’t make anyone sick. I do agree with your source regarding chewing and its role in the process of digestion. All over this site you will find references to how I like to “chew my smoothies.” However, you can eat a smooth soup that wasn’t prepared in a Vitamix just as you can drink a vegetable juice that wasn’t made in one, and you wouldn’t anticipate feeling any ill-effects. In short, I just don’t think your blender is the source of your problems. If you are lactose intolerant to any extent, this would seem to be a more logical explanation. Again, though, I can’t recommend you alter your diet based on what you’ve described – it’s just not my placed as as I’m not a qualified medical expert.

      For future soup-making, the amount of required blending time is always going to depend on the starting temperature of the ingredients you are using. If they are cold to start, you will have to blend longer. If room-temperature or above, the required blending time to reach your desired level of warmth will be shorter. The good news is there is no one answer for everyone. Feel free to experiment by stopping your blender periodically and checking for what level suits you. Except for blending much too long such that your soups are too hot to enjoy, there really is no way to mess one up. Also, as I’m sure you know, the hotter you make the soup, the less nutrition your ingredients will potentially yield. I wish you the best of luck in finding out the source of your discomfort and hope that whatever it is doesn’t discourage you and your husband from continuing to make a concerted effort to eat more healthily.

  21. Robin says:

    I am a new Vitamix owner of a 300 model. Love it but want to expand my recipes beyond the book that came with it. When I compare recipes for the 300 versus 5200, most 5200 zoom right to high and hold for more seconds. Since the 300 can use more of the variable speeds due to a different cooling capacity and complete processing faster a little faster (based on the recipes I’ve compared), I’m wondering how best to convert 5200 recipes for my use. Or am I crazy and should just follow 5200 recipes as is, using speed 10 as high. Thanks so much!

    • bd bd says:

      Robin, no you aren’t crazy (I don’t think :-) ), and yes, you should generally make a gradual increase to Speed 10 with your Pro 300 in these instances. Almost all Vitamix recipes, regardless of the model blender you are using and unless otherwise stipulated, will be optimally achieved using the highest speed settings. Yes, you may occasionally have to stop the blender a bit sooner or later than a recipe mandates if it wasn’t designed specifically for your model. However, that’s the best “training” for you to become intimately familiar with your blender. This encourages you to really pay attention to your blending and learn the machine’s capabilities and limitations. Once you know how it works on the highest setting, making future recipe adjustments becomes that much easier.

  22. Joe. L says:

    BD,

    I need some help here. I just wrote you a personal e-mail about why I had to return my Blendtec for a Vitamix. So I got a Vitamix CIA. I was just telling my wife that for her purposes, she’d probably actually like the Vitamix better than the Blendtec because she likes to make dense things, like ice cream.

    So, we unpacked the Vitamix, and I was bummed that I didn’t have my Blendtec, but I decided that I’d try to do something I was always envious of the Vitamix for: make peanut butter. Well, I made the peanut butter and couldn’t get it as smooth as I do with the Blendtec. But I figured that was just because I had to get used to it. But then my wife tried to make one of her staples in the Blendtec, the banana ice cream. I really thought this was where the Vitamix would really shine. So she put in a few frozen bananas and started to tamper the bananas… she was straining to push down with the tamper… I didn’t realize how hard pushing down with the tamper would be… it’s definitely not “easy” for thick stuff… anyway, as she was tampering, she was complaining about a burning smell. I tried to say that was normal and even our Blendtec when it was brand new did that… but before I could even finish explaining that, the Vitamix shut off. At first I thought she did it, but then I saw that the switch was still in the on position. Then it started smoking… and this was only the second blend… I don’t know what to do now… is it dead? I’m not sure.

    In short, so much for the “invincible” Vitamix… and I really miss the Blendtec… I am starting to see where the stronger motor really excelled… :(

    • bd bd says:

      Joe, I did receive your email about your faulty Blendtec container. It sounds like you have the blender blues these days! ;-) By now I’m hopeful you discovered that your Vitamix shut off via its overload protection design and hopefully re-started about 45 minutes to an hour after this incident. If it did not (or has not), then you’ll definitely be wanting to take that unit back. The burning smell would not overly-concern me, as this is common with these blenders on initial use. The copper windings around their motors have coatings that usually burn off during the first few hours of operation as they cure.

      I am slightly more concerned that the blender did not handle the bananas. Frozen banana “ice cream” has for years been one of the most popular desserts in the raw-food community and Vitamixes are famous for how well they make it. Also, though some effort is definitely required when using the tamper on recipes calling for large quantities of frozen ingredients, it shouldn’t take so much that the average user feels like he or she is straining to implement it effectively.

      It is tough to say exactly what happened in this incident without having been there myself. If I had to guess, the blender is fine, and I would expect both better results and a better overall user experience if you tried this exact same recipe a second time simply because it’s the norm with a Vitamix. I encourage you to try it again. If you and your wife experience similar results, I would be more inclined to believe your individual unit is faulty to an abnormal extent and should be returned.

      • Joe L. says:

        BD, thanks for the reply. You have got me wondering if it is the machine itself… lol… to say I’ve been hit by a string of bad blender luck would be no exaggeration.

        As for the Vitamix, yes, I think the thermal switch had been activated. It was a little unsettling that it was smoking, though. I’d never experienced that before.

        We did try the banana ice-cream again, but we followed a recipe that said to let the bananas thaw for 20 minutes at room temp… is that pretty standard?

        Also, today I made a green smoothie that I typically made in my Blendtec: about 1/2 cup of water, a whole orange halved, a slice of pineapple about 1/2″ – 1″ thick with core, an apple quartered and de-seeded, a whole banana, about 2 tablespoons of flax seeds, and about 2 or 3 handfuls of spinach with 10 ice cubes. I would put this on the soup cycle and it would blend with virtually no problem. But today, in my Vitamix, I had a hard time tampering to the point where I was growing pretty frustrated. And I noticed one segment of the apple was just spinning around in a circle, so I tried to catch it with the tamper and it seemed that even when I was able to catch it and push it into the blade, it wasn’t blending properly. So I let it blend for quite a while until I didn’t see it anymore and thought it was gone. But when I was pouring my smoothie into a glass, that apple quarter, almost completely intact, fell into my glass. Total blending time was around 4 minutes. Does this at all sound typical? I can’t tell if it is just because I am not used to working the Vitamix, or if it is a faulty machine. lol after it was made, my wife said she thinks it was a hair smoother than the Blendtec, and I just said, “Well, I would hope so after 4 minutes, since I only did it in the Blendtec for 1.5 minutes/90 seconds”.

        Also, I bought my Vitamix brand new, but when I opened the box, nothing was wrapped in plastic other than the cook books… is that normal? I am wondering if I got a reconditioned one that was sold as new, but doesn’t work as new. I know when I first bought my Blendtec, everything was individually wrapped in clear plastic bags. But since I’ve never owned a brand new Vitamix before, I’m not sure how it is supposed to be packaged.

        • bd bd says:

          Joe, thawing frozen bananas prior to blending is commonly recommended, but certainly not mandatory. I almost never do. With any high-performance blender, occasionally a piece of fruit will get lodged at an angle whereby the blade will make a complete pass through the fruit, taking out only the segment through which the blade passes. Subsequent passes of the blade will not dislodge the piece of fruit because the blade no longer makes contact with any part of it. This, though, does not seem to be what is happening in your case. It sounds as if the blade may only be spinning intermittently, in which case you would have a faulty machine. In such an instance as this, with a brand-new machine, I would recommend a return or exchange rather than exercising warranty repair.

          Yes, the Vitamix components are packaged ready-to-use inside custom-formed Styrofoam. Some parts may be partially covered in a foam-like wrapping, but plastic bags and/or shrink-wrap are not used on the main components. There is no reason to suspect you received anything but a brand new unit.

        • Joe L. says:

          Just an update. After some more frustrations with my Vitamix, I decided to call Vitamix. As strange as it sounds to me, they apparently don’t wrap the motor base or jar in their packaging…

          As for the performance issues, they said that wasn’t normal and that it shouldn’t have had trouble blending only 1/4 of an apple like that, especially not for the duration I blended. So to the VM rep’s advice, I returned the machine, and did the exact same smoothie to infinitely better results. And tampering this time wasn’t a huge chore like it was last time.

          I think I might have just gotten a lemon. I know all stuff can have defects, but the reason I didn’t turn the other cheek for Blendtec was because their defect seems to be too common of a complaint.

          • bd bd says:

            Joe, it sounds like you received some good advice from Vitamix. What you described certainly did not sound normal. I’m glad you didn’t give up on Vitamix, though. Hopefully you will thoroughly enjoy your new unit.

            • Joe L. says:

              BD, thank you for your patience in answering my questions. I’m really glad that I have watched enough Vitamix demos to suspect something was wrong.

              But, I exchanged my Vitamix with a new one (same model) and it’s a difference in night and day. And tampering isn’t such a huge chore anymore either. And now my smoothies are turning out every bit as good as I ever got them in the Blendtec. And most importantly, my wife loves our new Vitamix. So Vitamix is redeemed in my eyes :D

        • Rob says:

          Sending back for the 2nd time. Worse than a blender 1/10th the price. We’ll see what happens.

  23. Cindy says:

    I received my refurbished VM variable speed blender 3.5 months ago. I use the blender 5 times a week and love it. Basically I have been making a fruit and veggie blend 60/40 smoothie for the family and they love it. My friends that have tried my smoothies are so excited that only fruit and veg’s and a little water go into the drink and that the drink is so smooth. I have had a couple friends comment that the bullet and ninja they have both create quite a bit of foam and they hate that. The VM has never done that to me. If any of you have tried to make chili sauce from re-hydrated (cooked)dried chili peppers (Anaheim’s in this case) you would find out there is a lot of waste in other machines because, in this case the ninja with its multiple blades does not cut up the skins which are pretty tough and they are all thrown out. With the VM the skins on these chili peppers are pulverized and you cant distinguish them in the sauce-so all is used no waste. These are a few of the things I have found that makes me love my VM even more.

    • bd bd says:

      Cindy, thanks for sharing your experience. Though they are nice blenders in their own right, there really is no comparison between your Vitamix and the others you mentioned.

      • Cindy says:

        well that’s for sure. I did not realize the differences until I bought the VM and others started to tell me about their not so great experiences with their blenders and I told them about my experiences with the VM.

  24. Hairspray59 says:

    My favorite blender is the Vitamix 5200. I did make the mistake in the past buying a cheat one. Just didn’t do what it was supposed to. The 5200 is a tad noisy and takes up alot of space on the counter. I recently read a geed article “Vitamix 5200 Legend or Myth” you may like. However if something happened to mine. I wouldn’t hesitate to replace it and the price is worth it.

    • bd bd says:

      Hairspray, yes, you will find several articles like that across the web. Everyone seems to have an opinion and is eager to share it :-) .

  25. Carolyn says:

    Hi,
    I have enjoyed using my model 5200 VM 0103 Vitamix since 2009. However it does not fit under the cabinets on my counter. Would it be o.k.to use the wide 64 oz.lower container, which comes with the 750 professional on the 5200 base?
    I’m concerned that perhaps the extra horsepower in the 750 professional model is necessary to drive the wider blade in the low profile container.

    • bd bd says:

      Carolyn, your concern about horsepower in regard to the bigger blade does have merit. However, there are other issues that might render this idea moot. First, Vitamix does not sell the shorter, wider 64-ounce containers separately. They only come with the individual models for which they were designed. Secondly, the connection between the drive shaft on a Next Generation container and the 5200′s drive socket is not precise. It would work, but not without some potential alignment issues. For this reason alone I wouldn’t recommend trying it.

      Depending on how much clearance you need, try this trick: turn the container upside-down on the motor base so that the top surrounds the four posts of the pad on top of the motor base. Then place the lid over the base of the container which now faces up. This should buy you some extra space, sometimes even enough to get the 5200 to fit under some cabinets. Good luck to you!

  26. Beth Terry says:

    Several commenters have expressed concern about chemicals leaching from the plastic pitcher. The original Vitamix pitcher was made from heavy duty stainless steel. There are many of us who would feel more comfortable blending at high speeds in stainless steel rather than plastic. (Glass is not an option as it will not hold up to the high speeds.)

    There is a petition up on Change.org asking Vitamix to once again offer a stainless steel option for those of us who don’t feel comfortable with the plastic pitcher. (Even BPA-free plastics have been found to have hormone-disrupting properties.)

    Here’s the petition link: http://www.change.org/petitions/vita-mix-please-bring-back-the-stainless-steel-pitcher

    Thanks!

    • bd bd says:

      Beth, to be clear, the concerns raised on this site to date have been over the possibility of chemicals leaching from BPA-free containers. This is a subject I monitor as closely as I can, and to my knowledge there is no evidence to suggest that ingredients blended under normal conditions, including those in soups warmed in a BPA-free container via friction, are in any way subjected to exposure to these properties you reference.

      That said, I think a stainless-steel container would be a wonderful option for purchasers of any high-performance blender if for no other reason than to eliminate these concerns once and for all. I wish you nothing but success in this endeavor.

  27. HP says:

    Hey BD!
    So the other day I turned on my vita-prep 3 after I plugged it in to see its functioning, it worked. Then I put the the container on top with some macerated blackberries, it was more liquid than pulp. When I went to turn it on nothing. The amount of stuff in the container was only around 16oz of liquid and 2-4oz of pulp. It has been 4 days and the base is still not turning on. Please help!!! I love my vita prep

    • bd bd says:

      HP, based on what you’re describing this is not related to the contents of what you tried to blend. If it was an overload issue the blender would have reset itself in approximately 45 minutes. Since you are unable to turn your machine back on it is most-likely something Vitamix will have to take a look at. The VitaPrep should have no difficulty at all with macerated blackberries. Hopefully your machine is still under warranty. I wish I could be of more service to you, but can only recommend you call customer service.

  28. Brandon T says:

    Vitamix is offering the 5200 recertified. In the notes section it states:

    “Label may reflect the following: 5200, CIA™ Professional Series®, Creations® II, Creations® GC, Professional Series® 200, Total Nutrition Center®, or TurboBlend® VS”

    I’m sure there are differences in these units. A brief rundown would be great. I apologize if this question has been addressed previously. Thank you.

    • bd bd says:

      Brandon, the actual blenders, themselves – from the motors to the control panels to the containers – in all the model names you mentioned are identical. What distinguishes the actual models when sold “new” are the “bells and whistles” that come with each blender. This could be anything from extra accessories to differing recipe books, but, again, the actual blenders are the same except for the model name printed on the front of the blender.

      What Vitamix does to create a Certified Reconditioned Standard model is take one of these blender motor bases, and, after putting it through their 17-point recertification process, re-packages it with a new container, tamper, and recipe book. This way every Recertified Standard model becomes identical to the next except for the model name on the front.

      If you haven’t already seen it, the following article contains charts which you may find useful in distinguishing the Vitamix models: Vitamix Model Comparison Guide

  29. Denala says:

    Hi, I got my Vitamix Creations II, 48 oz in late August, and all was going well until one fateful day when the vitamix accidentally, slightly came off of the rotator for a several seconds while on high… Crazy.. It made a high pitched sound like if someone was power sawing a piece of steel and after that I noticed some change in performance. For instance: pre milled flaxseed meal refuses to blend smoothly into my smoothies, Celery stalk strings bundle up, and smoothies just generally aren’t as smooth.
    My main question is how smooth do your smoothies come out? Is celery, flaxseed, or kiwi & strawberry seeds a problem in ur smoothies? I don’t want to feel as if I’m being paranoid from the brief incident, and I also would need to be sure if to send the blender for repair.

    • bd bd says:

      Denala, I’m sorry to learn of your misfortune. All the ingredients you mentioned are no problem for any of the Vitamix machines I use, so I don’t think you are being paranoid. If they were no problem for you, either, prior to this incident, then some form of damage has been done to either the blade assembly – most likely the drive shaft as opposed to the blades, themselves – or to the drive socket. A damaged drive socket would be both inexpensive and easy to replace. Check both the underside of your container and the drive socket itself for apparent damage. I then recommend you call Vitamix customer service and explain to them in as much detail as possible what occurred and/or what visual damage you have discovered. The resolution may require you sending in your machine for service, but it also may very well be covered under warranty.

      • Denala says:

        Thank you, I have to say this website is a God-send. The blades did not seem to be damaged at all so I will take a look at the socket. Thanks a mil.

      • Denala says:

        One more thing blender dude, I look at where the blades were connected in the container to base coupling I think you call it in the diagram, and there seems to be some water in the bottom part. Looks like precipitation there and I think I noticed this some weeks now. It doesn’t dry up at all. Any advice on that?

        • bd bd says:

          Denala, without examining your machine personally I can only speculate, but I would bet on this being directly related to the original incident. It sounds like the drive shaft of your blade assembly has become dislodged or damaged to the point where the seal surrounding the shaft is no longer functional. So, either small amounts of your smoothies or water from cleaning is now leaking into the coupling. My guess is once Vitamix makes the necessary repairs this will cease to be an issue as well.

  30. shrikrishna apte says:

    I m using vitamix in USA. It is excellant, but I want to buy it in India. Can u send me address ,contact.no. or email address of supplier in India? If possible in Indore MadhyaPradesh

    • bd bd says:

      Shrikrishna, please refer the the FAQ section of this site. Under “Vitamix FAQ” you will find the information I have on dealers in India. Good luck!

  31. Jack says:

    I’m a huge fan of the Vitamix. Green smoothies are ridiculously easy now–we just toss nearly whole vegetables into the blender with some water and let it do its thing. We used to buy a new cheap blender once every few months because we kept burning the motor out, but I think this one is here to stay.

  32. Carol says:

    I bought a 5200, white base Vitamix a few years ago. What is the difference in this than the 5200 you show with the dial in the middle? Mine does not have that. It does not say it is reconditioned or anything like that. At the time I had the option to buy a white or black base. I also would like to know how to get the whole foods cookbooks.

    • bd bd says:

      Carol, if your Vitamix does not have a center dial, it is a TurboBlend Two Speed model. The motor in your blender is the same motor as the 5200 and is every bit as powerful. The “High” speed is just as fast as that on the 5200 as well. The difference is the 5200 with its Variable speed dial allows the user to select any of 10 lower speeds on which to blend, whereas you have just a single lower speed setting to use. Today the TurboBlend Two Speed is only available in black finish.

      The Whole Foods Recipes book is available for purchase separately. You can find it here: Whole Food Recipes

  33. John moreira says:

    Hi. Just got the vitamix 750 and I really want to try making almond butter. I have heard some things about overheating and burning out the motor and am subsequently paranoid to try it. Do you think I should be concerned, or jus proceed with caution, or just do almond butter occasionally? Thanks

    • bd bd says:

      John, I think you should make as much almond butter in your Vitamix as you so desire. Your Pro 750 should make it perfectly, time after time. Keep your quantity from 2 to 4 cups at a time and you should be just fine.

  34. Chef Dee says:

    I have used Vitamix blenders since attending culinary school, and even currently in my capacity as Pastry Chef in a family restaurant. It just escapes all my mental capacity how surprised and disappointed people seem to be when describing the motor as being uncomfortably loud. Perhaps it’s just because I’m used to it, but of course with more power comes more noise. I have not yet had the pleasure of using one at home, but I hope to be able to afford that possibility soon! Keep up the great work, VM!!

    • bd bd says:

      Dee, thanks for your input and for sharing your experience. I hope you are able to own a Vitamix in the very near future. Best of luck to you!

  35. Tennessee Jed says:

    I ordered the Vitamix Pro 300 from Amazon. I’ve been using it for 2 days. I really like the following features: powerful motor, short/wide container with soft grip & pour spout, the way the lid fits, & the long power cord with storage under blender. My concern is that the rpm of the blade sounds the same between the 7 to 10 selections. I can’t see any change in the movement of contents or hear the motor get faster past 7. Is this normal or should I contact Vitamix? Thanks

    • bd bd says:

      TJ, the Pro 300 does employ what Vitamix calls “motor sensor feedback” whereby, depending on the ingredients currently being blended, as the Variable dial is being manually turned toward the higher settings it is possible for the machine to, on its own, implement “full” power before the Variable control actually reaches its highest setting. The purpose of such is simply to provide optimal blending performance. That said, I would think you should be able to discern an audible change is speeds if you perform a test using an empty container. If you can’t tell a difference this way, it could never hurt to give Vitamix a call and express your concerns.

  36. Meghana says:

    Please could you send the details of Vitamix dealers in India.
    I also wanted to check that if I used the free shipping code, would the shipping be free to Singapore?

    • bd bd says:

      Meghana, you can find the Vitamix dealer information for India in the FAQ section of this website under “Vitamix FAQ.” Unfortunately, Vitamix does not allow purchases made via this site to be delivered outside of North America, so the Free Shipping promotion is not valid in India. You would have to inquire with the individual dealer as to what that charge might be.

  37. Lisa says:

    I am about to purchase the vitamix and take it back to Australia. Hopefully they will let me on the plane. Not sure if I should take it onboard with me or place it in my luggage.

    I wanted to ask about what converter I would need to use in Australia and where I would find one. I am going to buy it from Costco tonight.

    • bd bd says:

      Lisa, I would caution you about doing this. You will probably be able to find a converter that will allow your machine to work in Australia. However, this will violate the terms of your warranty should something go wrong with the machine as a result. There is also a high probability that your Vitamix will not yield optimum performance if you step the voltage up/down.

      As for taking it on a plane, I have traveled with mine before, but not with the box it came in. I’ve always packed it along with my clothes and then checked my luggage.

  38. tanya says:

    hello

    i bought my vitamix from the uk to nepal well i\’ve misplaced the tamper and really need a replacement..pls can anyone tell me the name of dealers of vitamix in delhi or anywhere else in india..

    tanya.

    • bd bd says:

      Tanya, please contact me with a valid email address and I will be happy to pass along what information I have available regarding Vitamix dealers in India.

      EDIT: I have just added contact information regarding Vitamix dealers in India to the FAQ section of this site.

  39. Andrew Dawson says:

    Hi BD

    I’ve just bought a 5200, through John Lewis in the UK. Most of the other blenders that I have used involve “locking” the jar to the base. With the Vitamix it would appear that you just sit the jar on the centering pad. Do you need to hold the jar when blending, or will it remain safely in place?

    Many thanks

    • bd bd says:

      Andrew, when I use the tamper with the Vitamix (I’m right-handed), I’ll always instinctively hold the container with my left hand. This gives me plenty of leverage for tamping in addition to an extra measure of safety. It certainly isn’t mandatory – it just seems to me to make for good, common sense. For recipes that do not require use of the tamper, there is no need to hold the container.

  40. Monica says:

    Please pass me the Vitamix Dealer contact number in Delhi,India. Do you advise to buy in US & bring it to India or buy it here directly? What about the price & warranty difference. Also, how’s VM 0103?
    Thanks
    Monica

    • bd bd says:

      Monica, please check your email regarding Vitamix dealers in India. I do not advise buying the U.S. versions of the Vitamix and taking them to India. You will need a voltage converter and, while this may work for using the machine, doing so would void your warranty with Vitamix on it. This is a big consideration you must make prior to purchase.

      I am unsure of the pricing on Vitamix models in India but I would speculate them to be considerably more expensive over there as opposed to the U.S. models. The VM0103 is a commonly used designation for numerous Vitamix models. All feature the 2 horsepower motor that has been used in the Vitamix line for years. They are great blenders. Good luck!

  41. abee says:

    Could please email me the dealers in india to buy Vitamix Professional Series 300 Blender

  42. B. Tanner says:

    I have the Vitamix 5200. I went online to find out if I could use other recipes to make smoothies using the Vitamix. It specified the order in which to add the ingredients and ice is added last. The amount of ice to be used wasn’t included. None of the books that I have include ice in the recipes, however, the Vitamix Recipe Book does. Do you happen to know how much ice is needed? By the way, can you juice in the Vitamix? Thanks BD.

    • bd bd says:

      B., I’m not sure which Vitamix smoothie recipe you’re referencing. Generally, though, ice can be added to almost any smoothie. How much is completely up to you. I try to imagine how the recipe would taste if I used water instead of ice, being careful not to use so much that it would dilute the flavor too much. Then, add up to that amount of ice. Another good rule is to start with less ice than you think you’ll need and add more accordingly. With experience you’ll “just know” about how much to use each time. Adding ice last into the container is always a good idea as the blades will use the softer/more liquid ingredients to pull down ice into the blend via a vortex-type action.

      The Vitamix is great for “whole juicing.” It does not separate liquid from fruits and vegetables like a juice extractor will. Instead, it incorporates the liquid along with the fiber into the “whole juice.” Many people prefer this over extracted juice because the fiber helps regulate assimilation of natural sugars into the bloodstream. Others prefer juice extraction because of the pure liquid texture of the juice. The Vitamix will not deliver this kind of result unless you take the extra step to strain the blend through a filtration bag or sieve.

      • B. Tanner says:

        Hello BD,

        Thanks so much for your assistance. I’ll notify you of the outcome.
        May God continue to bless you.

        Sincerely,
        B.

      • Ebony says:

        The Vitamix rep at my Costco says that fruits and veggies are completely liquified (ie no pulp) with prolonged blending. Is this true or is a strainer really needed to have pure juice? If a strainer is needed, how will this impact the fiber intake?

        Thanks!

        • bd bd says:

          Ebony, it is certainly true that the longer you blend, the more the fiber in fruits and vegetables gets broken down. You also have to keep in mind, however, that prolonged blending also leads to greater friction created by the blades which in turn leads to heating and, in some instances, even cooking your ingredients. Nutrient loss occurs rapidly over temperatures of around 117*, so you’ll want to make sure not to over-blend your smoothies to this extent. A strainer will filter out any fiber that has not been completely broken down. This is the best way to insure a purely liquid consistency, regardless of how long you blend. You may find that you can tolerate a certain amount of fiber, in which case the filtration bag or strainer would be unnecessary.

    • Jimmy B says:

      According to the Vitamix demo guy, the ratio is always one part ice to three parts solid.

      • bd bd says:

        For smoothies, ice in any quantity is completely optional and at the user’s discretion. There are really no hard and fast rules regarding it.

  43. jaime g says:

    Hello! Thanks for such an informative site. I have had my vitamix for over 6 years now (5200) and I love it. Lately, I’ve just been having a problem with the residue on the vitamix and it seems like I have to scrub it with baking soda/vinegar and a tough sponge every single day. I’m getting a little worried about the plastic leaching chemicals into the food, especially for my 2 year old daughter. What is the recommendation to change out the container/blade? (They have the container on sale at my local Whole Foods now for 98, which retails for 160 so I’m thinking of purchasing….what do you advise?

    Thanks,
    Jaime

    • bd bd says:

      Jaime, the residue collection to which you’re referring is most-likely due to normal wear on the inside of the container from the hard/frozen ingredients you’ve used over the years. I don’t think the risk of leaching in your container today is any greater than it was when it was new, as there is no coating on the co-polyester. I wouldn’t personally be in the market for a new container given what you’ve described. However, you are the only one who can put a price on your own peace of mind. A new container for under $100 is a very good deal. For even less money, there are also third-party websites that will sell you just the jar, into which you can transfer your current blade assembly.

      • jaime g says:

        Thanks so much for your quick reply! You are awesome! Went to Whole Foods today where they are having the demonstration and the rep told me to run it for 8 minutes with vinegar and lemon. It definitely helped, but still some residue. I have to admit though, I’ve never cleaned it the way they say to by running it with soap and water after use. I’ve always just sponged cleaned it…maybe that added to the problem. Just wanted to say thanks for your reply!!!

        • bd bd says:

          I don’t think it would have made a drastic difference. Hand-cleaning is a perfectly acceptable way of cleaning the container – just not the easiest. You’ve put a lot of use on your blender and the wear and subsequent cloudy effect of the container is to be expected over time. Nothing to worry about, in my opinion.

    • red says:

      We don’t get the pro750 at the agent in South Africa. I really would like to buy this model. Can you advise me of who will ship to South Africa and if the electricity will be compatible.
      We Have 220 240 volt.

      • bd bd says:

        Red, at this time no “Next Generation” Vitamix models, including the Pro 750, are available outside of North America. I do not know if, or when, Vitamix will offer these models to other countries.

  44. Cyndi says:

    Hey BlenderDude, I’ve used a Vitamix for over 5 years before giving it away to my daughter. I’m now using an Optimum, an Australian company which is very popular here in Australia, and I love it! Does all the same things, in one jug. They say they are faster, but not much difference in my option. I have the Optimum 9400 and I think it is even more effective at grinding as it has 6 long blades. The jug is heavier than my Vitamix, but everything else is pretty much the same.

    I still like the design of the vitamix, but in terms of performance and quality, no difference! Have you heard of this brand? What are your thoughts? Any feedback would be great :-) Also why is the Vitamix so expensive outside the US? It costs AUD$800-$900 here, I paid AUD$490 for the Optimum and does the same thing!

    Thanks!

    • bd bd says:

      Cyndi, yes, I am familiar with the Optimum line, but have yet to use one as they are currently unavailable here in the U.S. I have heard good things about these blenders, including their performance relative to Vitamix, and look forward to trying one in the near future.

    • Paul Mullican says:

      My Vitamix machine motor has burned up; smelt the motor windings. Is there any kid of trade in or repair program. I just hate to not recycle my machine. All it needs is a motor? I honestly beleive if I had motor, I could swap out. Any help is appreciated.
      Paul

      • bd bd says:

        Paul, Vitamix does in fact have a trade-in program, and, if your machine is out of warranty, they offer a paid repair service also. However, if your Vitamix is less than 7 years old, there is a good chance it is still covered under warranty. You do not have to have your original receipt nor do you have to be the original owner. Simply call customer service. They can track warranty coverage via the serial number on the bottom of your machine. This would definitely be my first course of action before considering an alternative involving letting go of it.

  45. Lindsey says:

    Hi!

    I received a BlendTech for my birthday (got it from Costco) and am wondering if I should return it for the VitaMix 5200S? I love to cook and am wondering if you have a comparison page that lists the differences between both blenders. It looks like the BlendTech has more horsepower (2 vs 3) and that the VitaMix comes with a tamper tool, but are there any other major differences? Should I keep the BlendTech?

    • bd bd says:

      Lindsey, it sounds like you may have missed my 5-part video series comparing these two models: Blendtec vs. Vitamix.

      It is true that the Blendtec has a slightly stronger motor. However, as you will see, there are other factors to take into consideration. You might see how the tamper could be quite useful in certain situations. Vitamix is probably found in more restaurant settings than Blendtec, for what it’s worth. Be sure to watch the video on the Twister Jar, though, to see other ways the Blendtec can be used.

  46. Michelle says:

    Hello! Your site is wonderful and I have read through many of your helpful notes – thank you!

    I noticed that several people asked about using a Vitamix in another country, and your answer usually included that it voided the warranty as soon as you did. I just bought my Vitamix 5200, and have been planning to take it back to South Korea with me as this is where I spend all but my summers. I have a voltage converter there that I thought would work, but now I am second guessing. It converts 220 to 110, and runs at 60 Hz.

    I have read through the warranty and manual, but don’t see anywhere that says using it outside of the US or Canada will void the warranty. There is a note at the bottom that states if the machine was purchased in the US or Canada, but is currently outside of the US or Canada, all shipping, taxes, duties etc to get it back for a repair are at the owner’s expense – but I guess that seems to allow for someone taking and using it outside of the states.

    I was wondering if you could clarify the warranty question for me? I certainly don’t want to ruin my beautiful new machine or void the warranty, but just hoping that I could find a way to use it there as that was primarily why I bought it.

    Thank you!

    • bd bd says:

      Michelle, I will go back and take a look at my wording to previous responses and I’m sorry for any confusion. It is not the use of the Vitamix in countries outside the U.S. and Canada that can potentially void the warranty – there are several countries that use the same voltage. Rather, it is the alteration of the voltage that will do so. If the owner’s manual and/or warranty doesn’t specifically exclude voltage converters, I’m fairly certain it forbids modification of the blender in any way and/or using adapters.

      Regardless of warranty status, there is some inherent risk to the blender associated with operation via converter. I’m not an electrician so I can’t speak definitively on the subject, but you may have noticed input from electricians in the comments sections here. Your Vitamix will work with the converter. How well, for how long, and at what risk to the blender and its warranty I cannot say, though. I would suggest calling Vitamix customer service for a thorough discussion of the subject before deciding what to do with your investment. Good luck!

  47. Mr Bennetts says:

    Why isn’t the Optimum blender included in your website? I’ve had one for 2 years, compared it to my mother’s Vitamix and love it! It’s a great blender, more affordable in the UK, and seems to have great specs. What are your thoughts BlenderDude?

    • bd bd says:

      Mr. Bennetts, currently the Optimum line is not available in the U.S. where I reside. I’ve heard nothing but good things about it, however. I will be happy to share my thoughts on it if and when the line makes its way over here.

  48. debbie says:

    This relates to vitamix containers. I am primarily looking at the vitamix models with the lower profile. Could you comment on the weight of the various containers when empty. I deal with arthritis in my hands and am wondering if the weight of the containers varies greatly. In fact, I have heard that the blendtex containers are lighter overall than the vitamix.
    Thank you for your reply and your very informative site.
    Debbie

    • bd bd says:

      Debbie, what you heard is correct in general. The Next Generation 64-ounce Vitamix container, with lid attached, weighs just over 2 lbs. The WildSide Blendtec container with lid is right at 1.5 lbs. The smaller 48-ounce Vitamix container weighs about the same as the Blendtec WildSide, perhaps just a little less. In general, I never notice the weight difference when switching from one container to the other. However, I don’t suffer from arthritis so I can’t speak to whether the .5 to .7 pound weight difference will be noticeable to you.

  49. David says:

    What is the difference between the CIA at bed bath and beyond and the 6300 series sold at Costco? I’m on the verge of making a purchace and feel a bit torn and confused? Both units are the same price? Thanks so much

    • bd bd says:

      David, the Vitamix 6300 includes 3 pre-programmed settings that are not found on the CIA Professional Series model. The recipe book packages are slightly different, also. The CIA comes with a 3-ring, easel-style book and includes a section of recipes from CIA chefs. The 6300 has a spiral-bound book. The motors in each model are identical.

      If you haven’t yet seen it, the details of both of these models have been charted for comparison and can be found in my Vitamix Model Comparison Guide.

  50. Anil kakad says:

    My wife had seen VitaMix in US and liked it.she did not buy because of voltage diff.
    She was told that she can buy from India. We are bases in mumbai .can you suggest from where to buy
    Or can you send by parcel? we are ready to Pay in whatever way you like.

    Anil kakad

  51. Theresa says:

    1. Is the Vitamix 6300 motor better than 5200 as a Vitamix guy in Costco told me? I got it 2 wks after I got 5200.
    Now I have both plus the dry mix and need to return one soon. please help!
    2. Twice my ice cream didn’t freeze when I used the preset frozen dessert setting. But the 2nd. time I got good ice cream without taking anything out and did it manually right away like the way I did with the 5200. Are the preset switches dependable at all? Others have this problem?
    3. In one week’s time I used the 5200 for smoothies, ice cream, muffins and soup from the cookbook I was happy with the results except some modifications to the soup recipes needed to suit my taste.
    4. 2 reasons for me to consider 6300;
    a. It’s easier for kids to make their treats, b. if the motor performs better and lest longer as the guy claimed.
    But I also need the justify the extra$$.
    5. What is the differences between 5200s (Costco) and the regular 5200?

    • bd bd says:

      Theresa, the information you received from that particular Vitamix sales rep is incorrect. I hear of this from time to time regarding roadshow reps of all the major blender manufacturers. They are paid on commission and this one was simply trying to boost his or her sales. It’s unfortunate but it does happen. The truth is, the motors on those two models are identical.

      The pre-programmed settings on the 6300 are specific to certain Vitamix recipes. They have been designed to work with specific ingredients, ingredient volumes, and ingredient ratios. Deviating from these even slightly may result in less than optimal results. Operating the Vitamix manually like you did is one safeguard against a poor result as you can always stop the machine when you feel like the consistency you desire has been reached. Likewise, you can always re-start the blender if you feel it’s necessary.

      Your point about pre-programmed settings being easier for kids is valid. Anything that gets them on the path to healthier eating habits is legitimate. Pre-programmed settings may be more fun for them, too. However, learning to safely operate the blender manually with supervision, including using the tamper, can be fun also, and is not terribly difficult in my opinion.

      The difference in the 5200 and 5200s is the recipe book. The one with the 5200s is spiral-bound as opposed to easel-style hardbound and has slightly fewer recipes. The 5200s is also only available in Black. Otherwise they are identical machines.

  52. Graham says:

    My wife wants a Vitamix for us to start drinking green smoothies. She told me to look at the Turboblend VS. Would you recommend it over the 5200 for these kinds of smoothies? Thanks in advance for your help.

    • bd bd says:

      Graham, either of the Vitamix models you mentioned would be an equally excellent choice for green smoothies. The actual blenders, themselves, are identical.

  53. Hawaii5Ohana says:

    Aloha,

    Help we are having smoothie withdrawals in Hawai’i!!! I have Vitamix 5200 and the drive socket stripped. I ordered a new drive socket that was stated for all Vitamix models, but it doesn’t fit. Do you know where I could buy a drive socket for the Vitamix 5200? Even after researching on the internet, I cannot seem to find one specific to this model.

    Thanks :)

    • bd bd says:

      H5O, you are looking for Vitamix part 891. It is a very common replacement part for almost all models, including the 5200 – I’m surprised the part you received doesn’t fit. If you don’t trust the online supplier you can always call Vitamix customer service, 800-848-2649.

  54. ewormuth says:

    Hi Blender Dude, complete Vitamix noob here. It’s the reconditioned 5200 I have, and I tried making my first smoothie today. Something was not right, because when I got past 7 on the dial, the whole unit was vibrating so badly I thought it was going to go right off of the counter! I couldn’t get it up to “high.” The problem, it seems to me, is that there’s nothing holding the container onto the base — no “locking” mechanism like you’d have on a food processor. Surely this can’t be right, or surely I’m doing something wrong. The owner’s manual I got is not helpful — it just says “set the wet blade container on the motor base by aligning it over the centering pad.” Can you help me? Thanks.

    • bd bd says:

      Ewormuth, “walking,” as I like to call it, is a common occurrence with all high-performance blenders, not just Vitamix. The issue is is not related to the container. It can sometimes be related to the current the machine is pulling at any given time. It can also be related to the particular ingredients loaded into the container. It can happen randomly, even with identical ingredients loaded into the container from one blend to the next.

      My first hunch is that this is just a random occurrence with your Vitamix. There is not tip or trick to give you which will insure it doesn’t happen again. I would try another smoothie using the same ingredients. See if the issue re-occurrs. If it does, I recommend you contact Vitamix and take advantage of your warranty coverage.

      • ewormuth says:

        Thanks for the info — I didn’t have enough liquid, it turns out. My husband is an ex-chef, and he set me straight. :)

  55. Laura says:

    Hello! I was wondering about the power cord on my Vitamix 5200. A family member borrowed it and she had too much of the cord out, was cooking, and it landed on a burner and melted. Anyway, I have a very handy boyfriend who thinks that maybe he can take it apart and install another one. I was curious if that is something he can do without purchasing a Vitamix wrench that I read about in another user’s question. Also, does Vitamix sell power cords or should I just get one at an electronics store? Thank you in advance!

    • bd bd says:

      Laura, the first thing I would do is contact Vitamix and explain what happened. Because it was user error, they may charge a fee to repair it, but it might very well be worth the expense to keep the remainder of your warranty in tact. If you attempt to repair it yourself, it may void the remainder of the warranty which you don’t want to do. I don’t think Vitamix sells power cords, so if you do elect to attempt the repair yourself, you can easily find parts to construct a new one. And, you would not need the special wrench for this.

  56. Brad says:

    I have read reviews of the various Vitamix cookbooks, and few people are impressed with them. I have seen a Create cookbook with a CIA Vitamix ( 5200), and most of the recipes only incorporate the blender for a small % of the actual preparation. Most of the preparation is done with the oven or stove. It seems that the cookbooks mostly utilize the Vitamix as a very expensive food processor. ( Twice the price of an elite food processor). Do any of the cookbooks – maybe even the new Create that comes with the 750 – have more recipes that are based upon the Vitamix for high % of preparation?

    • bd bd says:

      Brad, in my experience one is going to find a wide range of opinions on the recipe books that come with any blender. I’ve always considered them a “starting point” for learning the blender and facilitators for creating my own recipes. That said, you are correct regarding the books that come with the CIA and Professional Series models. They have a bent toward the way a chef would tend to use his or her Vitamix in a restaurant setting. All Vitamix recipe books are going to have recipes like this which involve only partial preparation in the blender.

      There are others, though, with a greater focus on more readily available ingredients and simpler preparation. In particular, “Whole Foods,” “Live Fresh,” “Simply Fresh,” and “Savor” are the ones I think you would prefer. Just keep in mind, if the recipe isn’t a smoothie/whole juice, ice cream/sorbet, sauce/dressing/puree, soup, or nut butter/dip, it probably can’t be made entirely in a blender. All Vitamix books will contain plenty of recipes that can, though.

      • Karen says:

        I’m going to jump in on Brad’s observation because I noticed the same thing. I own a number of different Vitamix cookbooks and have also observed that it seems for most of the newer recipes (many of which are otherwise excellent) the Vitamix is often used only the final step: blending. Frankly, and I say this as a seasoned owner of many years, this is ridiculous. I’ve seen recipes in the newer books that call for quantities of “chopped this” and “minced that,” which is silly given that these ingredients are going to be liquefied during the blending process. Unless something needs to be, e.g., sautéed first, use your common sense and just drop in a whole piece of whatever’s called for that’s roughly equivalent to the chopped amount. It’s possible that the chefs who developed these recipes work in an environment in which such ingredients are pre-chopped before a shift for use at hand in different recipes and that’s why this is specified but it’s beyond unnecessary at home. Save the hand-mincing and chopping for garnishes. :)

        • bd bd says:

          Karen, thanks for sharing your experience as well. I cannot disagree with anything you say. The editors of these books are really stretching things in calling some of these “blender recipes.”

  57. Monique says:

    Very nice site.
    Could you tell me if the containers for the 5200 models will work on an old vitamix 4000, base?
    Thanks
    Monique

    • bd bd says:

      Monique, the new containers will not fit on your 4000, directly. However, Vitamix at one time sold conversion kits that, once installed, would allow you to use the new containers with your model. I am not sure if these kits are still available or not. You are going to want to call Vitamix customer service to be certain: 800-848-2649. Good luck!

  58. travis hayes says:

    The motor on my Vita-Mix has stopped working (actually sparking) and I would like to get it refurbished/repaired. Where can I get this work done in the St Louis area (zip code 63368). Thanks

    • bd bd says:

      Travis, depending on how long you’ve had your Vitamix, it may still be under warranty – even if you are not the original owner. I suggest you call Vitamix customer service. Have your serial number handy so that they can check on this for you. Even if your machine is out of warranty, you are going to want to let Vitamix do the repair work which will involve sending your blender to them. They will even pay for the shipping both ways if your blender is still covered. Reach them at 800-848-2649.

  59. Debbie says:

    How does the CIA Professional series compare to the 5200? Thanks!

  60. Lindsay says:

    Hi, thank you so much for this information. I am looking to buy either a refurbished Vitamix 5200 or 7500. I have read reviews that the new 7500 container isn’t good for smaller than 2 cup quantities. If you are making a smoothie for one person, is this a big deal? Does it really matter for smaller quantity dressing? Thank you.

    • bd bd says:

      Lindsay, because they are wider at the base, the shorter, wider 64-ounce containers do require a slightly larger minimum volume of ingredients than the traditional containers. But you can make small-serving recipes in these containers – I’ve made 8 to 12 oz. smoothies in them. You can even go lower than this but it might require a little assistance from you with a spatula. On the flip-side, removing small-serving recipes from these containers is a little easier because you have more room at the base to maneuver a spatula. Any blender is going to have some degree of trouble with extremely small-volume recipes. I wouldn’t let this be an overriding factor in my buying decision.

  61. Karen says:

    I really must congratulate you on a WONDERFUL site; really, it’s one of the most comprehensive I’ve ever seen. I’ve been a Vita-Mix (before rebranding) owner since 1988 and am always happy to plug one of my favorite appliances. I’d note, though, that the dry container is designed to throw its contents upwards rather than sucking them down towards the blade assembly, hence it’s not the optimal option for making nut butter and the like (it is, however, the better choice for kneading dough). Also, someone asked about the ice blade. I was told by the commercial division that the standard wet blade’s tips will sometimes break off if subjected to the constant exposure to frozen matter that’s common in certain commercial environments (this is NOT a consideration for home use), hence the ice blade. It’s not as versatile or practical as the wet blade and unless one is planning on selling large quantities of frozen beverages from home, there’s no reason to own one.

    • bd bd says:

      Karen, thank you for the compliments on the website. Your being loyal to the Vitamix brand for 25 years is a real testament to its quality – thanks for sharing. I always get a nice vortex action from the Dry Grains blade assembly when grinding my flours, but I do use the wet-blade container for all my nut butters. Like you, I can’t think of a reason to opt for the Dry Grains container for this task. Also, thanks for sharing your conversation with the commercial division regarding the Ice blade – will be good info to pass along.

      • Karen says:

        My pleasure and keep up the good work! Vitamix is blessed to have such an articulate and well-informed affiliate. It really reflects well on them.

  62. Deborah says:

    I’ve learned a lot by reading here and watching several of your videos, but I still can’t decide between the VM 5200 and the 7500. Would love to read/see more comparing them. I am vegan and will be making smoothies, soups, nut butters, etc. This is a leap of faith for me to spend so much on a kitchen appliance, but I want to add more raw fruits and veggies to my diet without having to chew them all. Any insight on how to choose between the traditional and next generation?

    • bd bd says:

      Deborah, I certainly understand that this is a large investment for just about anyone. Fortunately this is not a situation in which you can make a “bad” decision. Both the 5200 and 7500 are great. You operate both the same way and I doubt you would be able to tell the difference in smoothies, soups, or nut butters made from either. The 7500 might be slightly quieter while making them, might make them in slightly less time due to the larger blade (I’m talking a matter of but a few seconds, if at all, in most cases), and it might be short enough in stature to fit underneath your cabinets if that is important to you. Of course, the 5200 will make equally great results at a lower price point.

      When making your decision, don’t fret over performance. Either is going to make you very happy and will be a tremendous asset to your vegan lifestyle. Instead, focus on other factors such as size and, to a lesser extent, noise and maybe even color. Decide if these differences in features justify the difference in price for you, then act accordingly.

  63. Beigum says:

    I just bought 5200 vitamix with the separate dry container . Beside grinding can I use it for smoothies since the jar is smaller than the jar that came with it?

    • bd bd says:

      Beigum, yes, you can. It’s not going to hurt the container at all, although it might not be quite work quite as well as the standard container for smoothies and the like.

  64. KZ says:

    Hi, What a great website. Thanks for the insights.

    Forgive me if you already answered this question and I missed it.

    I have decided to buy a Vitamix Blender and I’m leaning toward the 5200 model since I don’t really mind the size and it will fit on our countertop (and I don’t think I will use the program features often). Do you have a point of view on whether to go the “new” route or reconditioned? The lower cost of the referb model is a great benefit, but it’s not the only factor as I view this as a long term investment.

    Thoughts?

    • bd bd says:

      KZ, thanks for the nice words about the site. I am a huge fan of all the Certified Reconditioned Vitamixes. Over the years I’ve personally seen the condition of several of them as they were returned to wholesale clubs, and most looked like they were in perfect condition. Add to that Vitamix factory re-inspects and tests each one, repackages them with brand new containers and accessory packages, and then backs them with the exact same warranty coverage as the new machines (but for “only” 5 years as opposed to 7), and you’re getting a deal that’s hard to beat, in my opinion. I’ve never received a single complaint from a customer who purchased a reconditioned Vitamix through this site. Not one.

  65. Lance says:

    Hi, we just bought a Vitamix 5200. So far, it’s great. However, I want to make my juices more of a liquid and less of a smoothie. I’m a “follow directions” kind of guy. Is there a specific time that I can blend my ingredients to make it go from a smoothie to a pure liquid juice?

    Thanks!

    • bd bd says:

      Lance, always keep in mind that a blender is not a juice extractor. No matter how perfectly blended your ingredients, the fiber will still remain. No specific speed or blend duration will change that. If you want a more juice-like consistency, there are three things you can do to achieve it. One, you can add straight liquid to your recipe (water, tomato juice, etc.). Another method is to increase your ratio of high-liquid to low-liquid ingredients like more tomatoes for veggie juices, or citrus for fruit juices. A final way would be, after blending your ingredients well, strain your results through a mesh bag (nut milk bag). This will trap the fiber, leaving you with just the liquid.

      Which ingredients you’re blending will dictate duration, but for most juices with a Vitamix, 45 to 90 seconds on High should suffice. You can blend as long as you like, but keep in mind the longer you blend the more friction will be created between blades and ingredients. If you blend for several minutes the heat will build correspondingly, and could result in rapid nutrient loss. You don’t want that when juicing.

  66. JM says:

    Does the Vitamix Professional (Model VM0103) perform any differently with hot soups or small amounts? Im struggling between the VM0103 and the 5200. I need some help determining what the small differences would be. Also- What does ‘authorized’ dealer mean? If I purchase a Vitamix I see in a store what are my risks? Thank you!

    • bd bd says:

      JM, “VM0103″ can be used to describe any Vitamix model with the 2 horsepower motor, including the 5200 model. I’m not exactly sure to which specific model you’re comparing to the 5200, but, regardless, it will perform exactly the same as the 5200 for both hot soups and small-volume recipes. Each will contain the exact same motor and High speed settings.

      Purchasing through an authorized dealer means Vitamix will honor the full warranty that comes with the blender, although the return policy will be up to the dealer, itself. Purchasing through an unauthorized dealer puts both the return policy and warranty at risk. Vitamix handles both the return policy and the warranty when purchasing through an authorized affiliate, however.

      • JM says:

        The model was just called the CIA professional Series Blender in brushed stainless steel and did not list a number so I was not sure how to find it in your list of Vitamix models. It has a 64ounce jar. It is not the same as the 5200 pictured in your demos so I just wondered how the CIA Series was different..the price is a little higher.Thank you!

  67. Huyen Nguyen says:

    Could you please let me know about leaching of chemical from the plastic blender cup.
    Are there any research document showing the safety of using Vitamix plastic blending cup for pregnant and to become pregnant women? (Especially with very high friction and high heat)

    Looking forward to receiving your reply.
    (I got a Vitamix 6300, but not put in use yet)

    Thank you very much

    Huyen Nguyen

    • bd bd says:

      Huyen, chemical monomers such as bisphenols are commonly used to form plastics, and research has linked these compounds to disrupted cell behavior in humans which could contribute to health conditions such as early puberty, obesity, diabetes, and even some forms of cancers. To your concern regarding pregnancy, the threat is even larger to fetuses and growing children because of the still-developing cells in many parts of their bodies. Bisphenols like BPA and BPS are much more likely to leach from plastics into food and beverages when prolonged contact with the plastic exists, or when exposure at boiling or near-boiling temperatures occurs.

      All Vitamix containers are made of Eastman Tritan Co-Polyester. Though a polymer (a plastic comprised of many monomers), Eastman claims its chemical makeup is completely free of all bishpenols. Though I cannot point you to a specific research document, Tritan has undergone numerous independent tests and has been ruled food-safe by the FDA and other regulatory agencies. Many plastic manufacturers can substitute bisphenols in order to implement the “BPA-free” moniker, but Eastman insists that Tritan contains no such chemical compounds.

  68. kim says:

    I’ve been researching for weeks and your website has been invaluable! That being said,I’m still unsure which to buy. I’m wondering if it’s wise to plan on a blender for all my grain grinding? Would i be better served to save the money from the dry container and just buy a grain mill? And then there is still the question of blendtec or vitamix …

    • bd bd says:

      Kim, thanks for the nice words about the site. It should come down to just how much milling you plan on doing. Myself, I don’t do a tremendous amount of baking from scratch, so when I do, my blender is what I use to mill. Both the Blendtec and Vitamix will do a great job on all types of grains and, if you control the friction, you can achieve super-fine flours. But this can be time-consuming as grains will heat up just like soups, so the finer you want your end result, the more patience you’ll have to exercies with your blender. However, without being an expert, I am quite certain there are relatively affordable mills out there that will achieve ever finer textures in significantly less time. So, you will have to weigh the value of how much time you’ll spend milling vs. desired texture quality vs. cost, and make your buying decision accordingly.

      If you do decide to make your blender your primary mill, the Blendtec will work very well using the same container you would use for all your other blending needs. The Vitamix Dry Grains container, though, will produce ever-so-slightly finer textures over the course of the same blending duration than either the Blendtec or the Vitamix standard container.

  69. VALENTINA RUTSTEIN says:

    Hi BD, I am one of these people, lost in the ocean of choices, and not knowing which way to go.
    I have a couple different kitchen gadgets, have two different juicers for greens,and carrots, but now I want to invest in a Vita Mix to make smoothies, that has pulp and juice. Also I want to make a dough for bread. That is basically all I need. Not sure what is the best choice for me. Inclined to go with the Pro 300. Do I need a dry blade with this to make dough? Or I can make it in a wet blade? Do I need dry blade at all? I will not grind grains, my nut butter I make in a stainless steel processor. Your site is so informative, and you are kind enough to answer all questions. I bought Omega blender, and returned it, was not a good machine, though the juicer is very good. Will appreciate your help.

    • bd bd says:

      Valentina, thank you for the nice words about the site. Any Vitamix in their entire line will make superb smoothies. I do mean any. You can also use any Vitamix to make bread dough. Just keep in mind that for that task it won’t be as simple as loading ingredients and turning it on. To do it right it is a multiple step process. There are probably more efficient ways to make bread dough. But, these blenders will certainly do the job.

      Base your decision on other factors such as size, price, and whether or not you think you’d be more inclined to manually operate your blender or have pre-programmed cycles do it for you. You will not need to purchase a dry blade based on the functions you say you want to perform. The standard container will be all you need.

  70. michelle says:

    Hi.
    I am trying to decide between the 5200, the reconditioned 7500, or the Pro 750.
    I understand the 5200 is great and the lowest price, but I can’t help but feel the extra power, larger blade and shorter container add enough value to go up. I also like the idea of preprogramming for my family, but not sure I can justify that price difference or not.
    What do you think?

    • bd bd says:

      Michelle, you are definitely on the right track toward making a decision. In fact, you’re almost there. You’ve isolated factors that not only distinguish the different models from one another but also are important to you and, potentially, your family. Everybody wants the most bang for the buck, but only you can determine how much each distinguishing characteristic of these models is worth to you. I could tell you how much they’re worth to me, but that would be terribly misleading. For instance, I’m single and have tens of thousands of blending cycles-worth of experience with these machines. Were I in the market for one, I would more than likely have a completely different set of buying criteria than do you.

      Without knowing you at all and simply reading between the lines of your comment, I would suggest that you weigh the shorter container and pre-programmed settings more heavily in your decision. The extra power and larger blade are both very nice features, but the performance difference will be negligible in terms of the “finished product.” In other words, I could all but guarantee you couldn’t tell the difference in a smoothie I made with one model over the others.

      Where you will potentially keep the blender in your kitchen might be a much bigger concern, on the other hand. I can also tell you that anything that can be made with a pre-programmed setting can be made manually, too. But what I can’t know is how inclined you or your family members might be to use the blender (and, hence, hopefully try to practice healthier eating habits) due to the supposed “ease” of a set of pre-programmed cycles. So, this might be another consideration on which to place more emphasis. But, again, ultimately only you can make these determinations.

      • michelle says:

        You are awesome! Thank you so much for the quick reply. I tend to be indecisive and you did help a lot! Thank you for being so quick and thorough and for figuring me out quite fast! :)

  71. TGardner says:

    I am buying a Vitamix THIS WEEK and with all these different models im so afraid of making the “wrong choice”. I do a lot of blending/mixing now and I am literally juggling a processor, 2 blenders and a travel bullet!!. so its nutbutters, soups, flours and smoothies and many many more. Now I have read a review that indicated the 750 blades were too wide for nubutters? surely this cant be true right? He said 10 minutes to make nut butter in the 750? it takes my $30 black&decker processor that long! Have you tried nutbutters in the 750?

    • bd bd says:

      T, the information in the review you’ve mentioned is terribly inaccurate. I’ve made wonderful peanut butter in the Pro 750. Total normal blending time is right around 90 seconds. The only possible exception to this is if you want to make extremely small batches (as in, under a cup). In such a case it will still work but might require a little more “help” on your part via a spatula.

  72. Beck says:

    I have been researching the 5200/6300 and Pro 300 models for quite some time. I had finally decided on a reconditioned 300 based on the newer 64 oz container design. I will mostly be making green smoothies, nut butters/milks and baby food, salad dressings and hummus. But then I came across a comment that suggested the taller style container can handle smaller amounts (1 cup or so), while the newer style 64 oz container works best with 2 or more cups. Can you comment on this?

    Also, do you know if the Pro 750 will be offered as a reconditioned model any time soon?

    Thanks in advance, your site has been very helpful to me!

    • bd bd says:

      Beck, with any well-designed blender the key to optimum performance is going to be covering the blades with sufficient ingredients to allow a vortex effect to be created (a constant re-circulation of the ingredients). Reason stands that, if two blades are of similar height, the one that is in the more narrow container will be “covered” more easily. So, to some extent your concern has merit. There is a difference in the “minimum” ingredient amounts you’ll have to put in the two containers, but it is negligible. A lot will depend on what you’re making and its consistency. Very dry tasks, such as grain grinding, and very wet tasks, such as whole fruit juicing, will require a lower “minimum” than thicker recipes because the ingredients won’t be inclined to stick to the container’s sides.

      Thicker recipes such as baby food, hummus, and some sauces could require some “assistance” from you with a spatula if you are intent on making very small batches with the wider-base models (less than a cup or so). But you can still get them done. The narrow-base containers will allow you to make slightly less at a time, but the trade-off is that contents are slightly more difficult to remove from the bottom of the container around the blades than they are with the wider ones.

      My guess is that sometime down the road Vitamix will offer the Pro 750 as a reconditioned option, but it will most likely be for short windows at a time as their inventory dictates. Don’t hold me to it, though.

  73. Tony says:

    I have a vitamix model TNC (vm0103) and have been told the 1152 blade will not fit. Have you found this to be the case? I am thinking of upgrading to the Eastman Tritan BPA-free container. Will the container fit my motor base, and will the 1152 blade fit that container? Thanks for your help.

    • bd bd says:

      Tony, I believe the 1152 blade assembly will fit all Vitamix models except those with the new, shorter containers and, of course, many commercial models. This assembly will fit the BPA-free containers, which will in turn fit your TNC.

  74. John says:

    Can you tell me what is the date of the above article?

  75. kareldr says:

    Hi, I am from Europe and currently here is only Vitamix 5200 on the market. Is Vitamix going to sell their 7500 model here? If yes, does it has any sense to wait until it will be on the market here in Europe? I mix raw vegie often. For me, quality of mixture is more important than noise or height of the container. Can you help me please?

    • bd bd says:

      Karel, I am generally not notified in advance of Vitamix’s product line expansion plans but I can tell you that, as results are your primary concern over aesthetics and the like, the 5200 will be everything you will need and then some. You will not be disappointed in its performance whatsoever. It will blend your raw vegetables as well as any blender on this site in my opinion.

      • kareldr says:

        Thank you for your answer. Vitamix TNC 5200 ordered. Sorry I can not thank you by ordering it through your web. It would be appropriate reward for wonderful job you and your colleagues do by collecting fact and nice useful videos on this site being as fair as possible and objective. But you sell only US version. Good luck and have a fun :-)

  76. Ginger says:

    I’m looking at the Vitamix 1365 CIA professional series. I don’t see it on the Vitamix website. Can you tell me which one it compares to on the company site? Thanks – you have some GREAT information here.

    • bd bd says:

      Ginger, that is the standard CIA Professional Series model. The “1365″ simply designates its color, in this case Ruby (red).

  77. yesh says:

    Hi,

    I am based out of India and I understand that the Vitamix 5200 is the best of its kind in the world presently? I want to purchase it. However, there are only 2 dealers in India of Vitamix and they have the product “Drink Machine Advance”. They say that it is the same as the Vitamix 5200.

    Can you please confirm me the same?? If it is different, I would rather import it directly from the US. Please help!

    • bd bd says:

      Yesh, the Drink Machine Advance has the same powerful motor as the 5200, but it is an altogether different type of blender. Designed specifically for frozen drinks and smoothies, it is controlled by pre-programmed cycles instead of manual speeds. The cycles can be custom-programmed, but the blender is much more practical in a commercial setting than for home use, in my opinion.

      A major caveat to importing from the U.S. for use in other countries is doing so will void the warranty of the blender. Strongly consider this before making your purchase.

  78. Mary says:

    I am getting my first Vitamix through an awards program where my husband is employed, so I don’t have to worry about cost. (!)

    The choices available to me are: the Vitamix 5200, the S5200 (includes the dry blade 32 oz. container), Deluxe 5200 (includes the wet AND dry 32 oz. containers), TurboBlend VS, Pro-200, Pro-300, Pro-500, or Pro-750.

    I’ve read all of your Vitamix reviews and others online, so I am somewhat familiar with the differences in the products and what each includes.

    As far as use…it is just my husband and myself and we will be using it for smoothies, soups, purees and exploring what else we can make in a Vita-mix.

    Since cost is not a factor, I am not sure which is the best choice? What would you recommend? Thanks!

    • bd bd says:

      Mary, what a nice problem to have! You probably already know that the Pro 750 is the most expensive option – it has the most “bells and whistles” of all the individual blenders. The Deluxe 5200 comes with the most “extras.” So, my choice would probably be one of these two since price is not a concern. The Pro 750 has a slightly stronger, slightly quieter motor, has a lower profile (meaning, it is designed to fit underneath most standard upper kitchen cabinets), and has some pre-programmed settings that you and your husband might enjoy. The Deluxe 5200 comes with extra containers that you might find useful for either smaller recipes or for grinding flours and nut butters. You really won’t go wrong with either. Congrats!

  79. Kelly says:

    I’ve just found three Vitamix blenders in my neighborhood that are available for purchase: 1) a 5200 ($300 includes 64oz container, tamper, dvd, recipe book, and the box); 2) a 750 professional ($450, it’s brushed stainless steel, only used a few times); and 3) a 36019 (“the quiet one” that she purchased for $1,000 and asks for the buyer to make an offer). I’m leaning toward the 750 professional because it’ll fit under my cabinets, will be slightly quieter, and it’s pretty. My concern: I don’t want to follow the recipes precisely. I want to throw in the ingredients and experiment QUESTION: Can I do that with the 750 professional? ALSO: Do you have a recommendation on which to purchase? MANY THANKS!

    • bd bd says:

      Kelly, both the 5200 and the Pro 750 look like nice deals. Both will give you excellent performance and results, regardless of whether you intend to follow Vitamix-specific recipes or not. So, experiment-away with either! Also, the warranties on both will transfer to you, so I would find out how long the owner of the 5200 has had her blender. You already know the Pro 750 is fairly new because that model has not been out for long. You have also identified other reasons why you might like the Pro 750, too. So, in your case, that is the model I would recommend for you.

      • Kelly says:

        Thank you, thank you, thank you for your thoughtful and speedy response. I’ll contact her now to purchase today. Thank you for contributing to healthy lifestyles everywhere. All my best, Kelly

  80. Gordon says:

    I was comparing the Vitamix line and after reading all of the responses to questions, the only one left unanswered is the need for the pulse button. I was considering a model that does not have a pulse button. Can I pulse just using the on/off switch?

  81. Ryan says:

    HI BD
    Looking at the Vitamix Website I cant see the difference between the 5200 and the Turboblend VS? The specs all look the same? But you can pick up a reconditioned 5200 for $100 less.

    Thanks

    R

    • bd bd says:

      Ryan, the TurboBlend VS blender does in fact have the same features as the 5200 but the recipes that come in the package are geared toward vegetarian and vegan lifestyles. The reconditioned machines are not necessarily all 5200 models, although most are. It is possible you might receive a TurboBlend VS if you order a reconditioned Vitamix. However, all the accessory and recipe packages will be identical.

  82. Elisaveta says:

    Hi Jonathan,
    I actually emailed you a bit earlier, but found this page and wanted to submit my question publicly, because others might find it informative.
    I have read so many if the questions and answers here, and am convinced that the Vitamix is one of if not the best blender out there.
    So, I actually want to know what your opinion is on NutriBullet? Why all the hype that it is better than the other blenders ( of course not better than vitamix), when its motor is 600 watts with 10,000 rpm’s.
    I did buy one out of curiosity because it was cheap. It did work at first, but then it started leaking and the motor stopped. So I trashed it. I’m also very surprised that David Wolfe is the spokes person. He looks like he knows his stuff, but seeing him backing up Nutribullet is very disappointing.
    Please, let me/us know your thoughts on this.
    Thanks a lot!

    • bd bd says:

      Elisaveta, I have, in fact, used the Nutribullet before. My conclusion is that it is a classic example of “you get what you pay for.” It is good for what it does – which isn’t everything. It certainly doesn’t replace a high-performance blender like those we discuss on this site.

      Mr. Wolfe has a very devoted following and is, in my opinion, a qualified authority on raw foods and nutrition. That said, he’s also a businessman and I’m sure his affiliation with the Nutribullet comes with nice compensation. Several of his prior “business decisions” have cost him a sizeable portion of his following, but that doesn’t change the fact that, in general, he knows his stuff.

  83. Heinz says:

    Hello BD,
    I live in Tokyo, Japan. Here we have 100V 50Hz. I understand that all Vitamixes can handle both 50Hz and 60Hz. How about 100V? Would running the Vitamix with 100V mean slower speed or less power? Or would the blender get hotter and wear down more quickly? Or any other problem? And how about the warranty? Would I still be covered running the Vitamix at 100V? Or is there no change or problem at all going down to 100V?
    Thank you for your great site and best regards from the Far East.

    • bd bd says:

      Heinz, I am not an electrician, but it would stand to reason that there would be some effective power loss when used at 100V. That said, the warranty will be null and void as soon as you use a Vitamix designed for North America anywhere other than the U.S. or Canada. For that reason alone I don’t recommend it.

  84. Carol Townsend says:

    Just love your site..have read every word. I’ve purchased the 5200, but still find the Pro 300 with the lower ‘fatter’ jar more appealing than the tall jar. I’m single and will probably use it most for smoothies. Seems like the wider jar/blades would do a better job on ice….but someone said that for one person, the taller jar is better as less liquid is required to cover the blades. Pls. help guide me to the pros/cons of either the tall jar (which I’ve purchased) vs. the shorter jar (Pro 300) which I still seem to like better, though it’s more expensive. Thanks…. Carol Townsend

    • bd bd says:

      Carol, there is technically some merit to this claim. Less liquid and/or other ingredients are required to cover the blades in the more narrow container. However, the difference is negligible as the blade assemblies in both containers are relatively proportionate to the widths of the respective containers. I would not let this be an overriding factor in my buying decision. Both models will do a superb job on ice and other frozen ingredients – the tamper will ensure that all frozen ingredients reach the blades and are blended smoothly. I would place more emphasis on size, appearance, and cost in deciding between these two models.

  85. Dave says:

    BD,
    First of all I’d like to congratulate you on the best comparison and informative site in regards to the VM vs Blendtec.
    After reading owners inputs and all the pros & cons I decided to go with the VM. I purchased both and will be returning the Blendtec untouched, due to my extreme satisfaction with the unit. It’s a solid machine, strong motor, excellent pitcher and even though it doesn’t fit under most cabinets its the choice to go with for ample ingredient capacity. Thinking about pitcher storage should be secondary, and believe me I’m hooked! I use it 3-4 times a day. It doesn’t leave my counter space.
    The controls on the VM are simple and straight forward. They say you can press the Blentec programmed buttons and leave the machine (seriously now…does anyone leave the blender) My point is I watch my VM blend my greens and i can manipulate the speed control to a fine art with the variable speed control (5200).
    Do I work for VM, NO! But I can honestly say I LOVE my Vitamix 5200. Worth every penny.

  86. alli says:

    I just purchased a 6300 model at Costco. The sales lady said it was the same blender as 750at William-sanoma. Is this true ? Should i return it and save money and buy the 5200 model? Thank you for your time.

    • bd bd says:

      Alli, the 6300 is the equivalent of the Professional Series 500, not the 750. It comes with some pre-programmed settings that you may or may not find useful, but it will not do anything the 5200 won’t. If you don’t think you will be inclined to use the pre-programmed settings frequently, I would suggest saving money and going with the 5200.

    • j dalton says:

      Just took my new 5200 out of box but noticed the container rocks very slightly on flat surfaces as well as on the base pad of the machine. I called the company to ask if it was designed to do that, and the answer was no, and that it should be replaced. Still wondering if the rep was correct. Any info? Thank you.

      • bd bd says:

        JD, the Vitamix container should absolutely look and feel completely stable when placed on the motor base. Some rocking is normal, of course, during blending, and I generally keep a hand on my container when I blend, especially when using the tamper. However, for simple jobs the container should in no way appear as if it is unstable at any time.

  87. Michele - Bergen CTy says:

    Hello,
    Well I purchased the 5200 yesterday. Haven’t tried it yet, but noticed that the jar turns 1/4″ each way when it’s on the base. Is that normal. A regular blender jar fits very snugly onto it’s base.

    • bd bd says:

      Michele, yes, this slight turn is perfectly normal. You will notice it occur just about every time you blend something as soon as you start the machine. Congrats on getting a Vitamix!

  88. Alysia says:

    I would be surprised if they do but I was wondering if the vitamix and blendtec jars are interchangeable?

  89. Mary Pencheff says:

    I am looking at purchasing the 5200 Vitamix or the new Pro 750. My questions are can I puree food with both? My mom needs pureed food and I would like to put prepared meals in this unit to puree them for mom. Are there instructions on how to do this in the manual/video? Do I need a separate wet and dry container for the 5200? and how much quieter is the 750? Do you think they will offer a shorter container for 5200 at some point? The height of 20 inches is a real drawback. Also, could you just store the container of the 5200 in the cubbard and leave the base out? Finally, the automatic settings on the 750 – are the recipes for these settings very precise in terms of the proportions? Would it be easier to just manually control the motor?

    • bd bd says:

      Mary, both the 5200 and 750 will be excellent for pureeing foods. If your meals are already prepared, then simply putting them in the blender will by definition puree them. That said, Vitamix has a page on their website dedicated to purees: Pureeing Instructions and Tips.

      You only need a separate “Wet” and “Dry” container if you plan on doing a lot of grinding of hard grains like winter wheat or corn. If you plan on doing only occasional grinding or grinding of softer ingredients like sugar, oats, etc. I would suggest saving money and using the standard “Wet” container.

      The Pro 750 is a little quieter than the 5200. There is not a drastic noise reduction. Of course, noise level is also dependent upon what is in the blender.

      Vitamix already makes a shorter container for the 5200 model. It is a 48 oz. container and, when placed on the base, stands at just under 17 1/2 inches: Vitamix 48 oz. Container. You can also buy the 5200 model that already comes with the shorter container: Vitamix 5200 with Compact Container. Storing the container and keeping the base on the countertop is always an option, too.

      The recipe book that comes with the Pro 750 is precise in terms of proportions. In fact, this is the entire key to getting desired results with the pre-programmed settings. With experience you might be able to deviate from the proportions slightly and still get good results with these settings. But, manually controlling the machine will still be the primary way you control the blender when you are using either your own recipes or those not in the Vitamix book.

  90. Michele - Bergen CTy says:

    Thanks so much for all the information on the Vitamix. I’m torn as well between a couple models. Do you know if the 5200S that they sell in Costco is refurbished? Just wondering because that’s the one I was going to purchase after seeing the 6300 demonstrated. Would it say “REFURBISHED” on the box?

    Thanks again for all the information.

    • bd bd says:

      Michele, the 5200s will be a brand new bender. The “s” simply designates it as being sold at Costco as opposed to through Vitamix or its affiliates.

  91. Sherri says:

    I am looking to sell my Vitamix 5200… I am wondering if anyone knows if my remaining warranty carries over to whomever buys it…
    Thanks!

  92. Morgan says:

    Hi there,
    I was wondering if I were to use the vitamix for savory things like garlicky dressings, if it would retain the garlic smell and then affect subsequent smoothies, ice cream, or pie crust recipes.

    This happened to me with my Ninja and it must have taken upwards to 25 washes to get the ‘flavor’ out. My raw strawberry cheesecake tasted like garlic.

    Would this be a potential problem? Would I have get two blender pitchers? One for savory and one for sweet?

    • bd bd says:

      Morgan, I can only tell you that this has never been a problem for me, personally. I have, on occasion, after making a soup or dressing with strong-smelling ingredients like garlic been able to detect a faint residual smell inside the container after cleaning, but it has never permeated into my next recipe. If the odor is unusually strong, I will repeat the cleaning process and add a few drops of liquid bleach. This always seems to work for me.

      • Morgan says:

        Bleach?! That would never be an option for me since I have a medical condition and react strongly to bleach. Both my kids do, too.
        Can I purchase an extra blender pitcher or can I buy a Vitamix that comes with two? If not, I would likely use my food processor for more savory or garlic/vinegar-based recipes.

        Btw, I suspect bleach really isn’t good to use. May want to try lemon juice, vinegar or tea tree oil as bleach has trouble leaving the system, and can cause neurological and autoimmune issues.

        • bd bd says:

          Yes, Vitamix sells containers separately: Containers & Accessories

          There are also packages that contain two, or more, containers: Vitamix Deluxe 5200

          Again, the occasions where I even have to use anything other than a typical cleaning procedure are rare. When I do use bleach in my personal blender containers, I use a minute amount – as in, a drop or two. I’m not cleaning with bleach, just adding a small amount to my soap/water mixture to eliminate odors. I am certainly fortunate, however, in that I have no such medical condition that reacts negatively to bleach.

          Health codes in the majority of the states in which I demonstrate the blenders require a water and bleach solution as part of the commercial cleaning/sanitizing regiment. So it is actually mandatory that it be used on my demonstration containers at the conclusion of a work day. Your other suggestions sound like good ones, though. I’ve never considered tea tree oil before.

    • RGM says:

      Does your Ninja work as advertised?
      I wish Vitamix would come up with a retrofit blade system to compete with Ninja.
      I think the base unit is a better product.

      • bd bd says:

        RGM, every Ninja product I have ever used does a reasonably good job with smoothies, but none match the performance of Vitamix in my estimation. I would not count on Vitamix ever designing a blade system similar to the Ninja. I doubt they feel it is comparable to any product they currently offer.

  93. Jill says:

    Can you compare the vitamix 5200 to vitamix 1002?

    • bd bd says:

      Jill, the 1002 is essentially the same machine as the 5200 but because it is marketed and sold as a commercial blender it comes with a much shorter warranty – 3 years as opposed to 7 years with the 5200.

  94. lotsofcloth says:

    I’m trying to decide between the 5200 and the TurboBlend VS. From your review, it appears that they’re identical other than the books they come with, yet the 5200 has a refurbished option. Is there any other difference between the models? I’m a vegetarian, thus the consideration of the VS. I can’t find any reviews of the Live Fresh cookbook — any thoughts on that? Is it worth the extra cost over the refurbished 5200? I like the idea of the stainless finish in the 5200, and the VS doesn’t have that.

    • bd bd says:

      LOC, The 5200 and the TurboBlend VS are in fact identical blenders. The differences are the recipe book, color options, and a slightly different accessory package. The Live Fresh recipe book is nice. The majority of recipes are identical to those in other Vitamix books, but it does contain some unique ones catering specifically to your vegetarian lifestyle. That said, there are a limitless supply of good, healthy, vegetarian recipes at your disposal online. So, I always advise customers to make the actual blender the primary factor in his or her buying decision.

      As for the factory-reconditioned machines, it is a common misconception that the 5200 is the model that comes with this package. While it is possible, if not likely, that you will get a 5200 if you order a reconditioned Vitamix, it might also be one of a few other models, too. Often your color/finish option will determine which one you receive. Regardless of the model, however, all will contain a blender with the same exact motor inside, brand new containers, and identical accessory packages.

    • Chelsea says:

      I purchased the TurboBlend VS last year and absolutely love it! After getting into a smoothie making routine, I decided to make every smoothie recipe from the Live Fresh cookbook.

  95. Jon says:

    What a great website – incredibly useful. I’m just torn between whether to get a Vitamix 5200 or a Pro 500. How would you compare the two? Is the main difference just the pre-set programmes on the Pro 500? Considering that I intend to make a lot of soup, I could see the pre-set programmes on the 500 being of real benefit to stop me having to wait around and keep checking the soup myself. Would this be your impression also, or do you think the 5200 is just as good? Thanks, Jon

    • bd bd says:

      Jon, thanks for the nice words about the site. Normally when someone is torn between these two models I will recommend the 5200 for the cost-savings, alone. The only significant functional differences between the two are the pre-programmed settings you mentioned. Personally, I have never found a great need for programmed cycles on any blender. However, based on what you’ve just shared, you seem to be the ideal user for the Pro 500.

  96. Dave says:

    Hi I am sold on the concept of getting a Vitamix. Before I spring for the 5200, Is there any reason not to buy an old vitamix 4000 besides the lack of warranty? Hoping to make smoothies soups ice cream etc…
    Thank you!

    • bd bd says:

      Dave, the 4000 is a super-cool blender. I’ve always liked the way that model looks, but I must let you know that I’ve never actually used it before. I know the stainless steel containers are still very desirable because they aren’t made anymore. That said, today’s newer models come with much stronger motors. I would be skeptical of the 4000′s ability to generate enough friction to heat ingredients to soup temperatures. Also, although it might very well handle the “abuse” I put my blenders through in the form of the frozen ingredients I use, I would be hesitant in treating the older models the same way, especially in light of the fact that they come with no warranty. For everything you appear to want to do with a Vitamix, I would recommend a newer model.

  97. jannette says:

    hey BD,
    I was looking at “Vitamix Total Nutrition Center” on the Canadian Vitamix site and was wondering if the 5200 is same motor but without fancy name or if “VTNC” is Updated?
    also the shipping Calculate Time and Cost to Canada?

    Thank you :)

    • bd bd says:

      Jannette, the Total Nutrition Center is the same machine as the 5200. It goes by a different name for Canadian customers, only. Shipping times to Canada are 7 to 10 business days for shipping, and 10 to 15 days, total, for delivery. In many instances you will receive it sooner, though.

      Cost is $35/Canadian but is free if you use my authorized affiliate code: 06-005956.

  98. Pam Smith says:

    Hello-

    My husband bought me a new Vitamix for Christmas. I already have a food processor and a Kitchen-Aid stand mixer. I’m really excited to use the Vitamix for making smoothies with lots of great veggies and fruits. I was also excited about the one container soup making but realized that I like to saute my veggies prior to making the soup and then using my immersion blender.

    My question is, given that I have all of these other appliances, and the fact that I haven’t had a need for a blender for the last 7 years, do you think it is worth spending the money on a Vitamix?

    What can I do with the Vitamix that I cannot do with a stand mixer or the food processor and with a cheaper smoothie maker such as the Nutrabullet?

    If I do decide to keep the Vitamix, do you think I can get rid of my food processor?

    Thanks!

    • bd bd says:

      Pam, those are all excellent questions, but, ultimately, only you can answer them. What I can do is provide a little insight into what the Vitamix is capable of doing. You should then weigh how much, if any, benefit this would be to you and your family along with what you already have in your kitchen that might give you similar benefits. If there is anything the Vitamix will do that other appliances in your kitchen won’t, you then weigh the cost of the machine versus those particular functions and determine if it’s worth it. If you haven’t already, read this:

      High Performance Blenders

      To your last question, specifically, I keep a food processor on hand for when I want a very fine dice to my vegetables. You can “pulse” the Vitamix to do this, but if you really need to control texture, a food processor might be what I’d use, instead.

  99. Matteo says:

    I just read that the plastic (BPA free or not) leaches into the blended food from the Vitamix!
    Yikes, I just opened the box of my just arrived vitamix turbo blender.

    • bd bd says:

      Matteo, every study I have ever read on this subject suggests that one of two factors needs to be present for even trace amounts of chemicals to become detectable in food and/or liquid housed in plastics: prolonged exposure or extremely high temperatures (as in, well over 200*+). Neither of these conditions is ever going to come into play with your blender. Were I you I would enjoy the benefits your new Vitamix provides without worry.

      • Rob says:

        Someone mentioned that the plastic [bpa free or not] was capable of leaching into the food ..you replied that was not a problem because you need 200 degrees to become problematic ..how hot does it get when making hot soup?

        Also …you stated that the cloudiness was a result of the plastic being ‘indented’ …that bothers me …. where did the material that was in the indentations ….go ? Does indentation mean that it is only indented or is there some type of chipping or leaching with the indentation.

        Why don’t they make a glass blendor …glass is not strong enough ? When this stuff is targeted at health consiousness it seems wacky to me to make stuff out of plastic.

        • bd bd says:

          Rob, these are all legitimate concerns. Although the Vitamix is capable of generating soup temperatures well in excess of 200*, normal “enjoyable” temps are much, much lower. Many people, in fact, like to keep their soups under 118* in order to avoid the rapid nutritional loss of ingredients once you start to go higher than that.

          I am not an engineer or designer, but when I reference “indentations” I mean compression, not chipping. I don’t know that an actual study of what, exactly, is happening to these containers has ever been conducted. My conclusions are solely my own based on close observation of them after thousands and thousands of uses. It is always possible that I am mistaken.

          Regarding glass, you are correct. It is glass’s inability to hold up under the duress people exercise on these blenders that manufacturer’s don’t use it.

          • Rob says:

            ok thanks,

            I feel that Vitamix needs to do the testing then and find out what is going on …

            My suggestion to vitamix would be to consider that a lot of people are simply paranoid about issues like this – because they pick up the newspaper all the time and read stories about how something was considered safe and adequate …only to discover years later – that it was not.

            I like glass …it seems very inert and I can leave my glass frying pan on the stovetop on High [have done this a couple of times and forgotten it was on the stove for an hour] …and no problem …if I do that with a stainless pan it can be big trouble.

            Vitamix needs , in my opinion , to manufacture a glass container …that is strong enough … ..don’t guarantee it …just offer it …so the paranoids among us can purchase it …if it only lasts a year or 2 then I, for one would be satisfied and my plastic fears eliminated.

            • Rob says:

              Just to let you know …called vitamix and they told me it was no problem – which I would expect …however , they also told me that the container will not cloud unless you put ‘oily stuff like cloves in it ” …not sure I’m buying that one …i will probably just buy the 7500 – take my chances :) … and then hope they find a way to make a glass container in the future.

              • bd bd says:

                Rob, I appreciate your input here on the site. I’d be interested, too, to see the reception a glass container would receive were it ever introduced.

  100. Sandra Kay says:

    Hi – Great information! Thank you for comparing, and sharing your knowledge.. I have my husbands Ninja under the tree today and looking for a replacement already. I will print off a picture of the VitaMix. I enjoyed reading all the information you provided.

  101. Lin L says:

    Thanks for your reply. You mentioned “cloudy” effect. Is that permanent ?

    • bd bd says:

      Lin, yes, the cloudy effect in the containers is permanent. It is caused from many minute indentations into the container from the harder ingredients like ice, frozen fruit, hard grains, and, in your sister’s case, certain ingredients in herbal medicines.

  102. Adam says:

    The Vitamix has changed the way I think about food. It allows you to do things that other blenders just aren’t capable of.

    It’s no wonder that this blender is the choice of professional chefs across the world.

  103. Lin L says:

    Hi, this is a great site. Lots of info. My sister just purchased a Vitamix for me. I wonder can the dry blade be used to grind some Chinese herbal medicine. They are a bit hard almost tree roots kind of consistency. Would they damage the blade? Thank you.

    • bd bd says:

      Lin, thanks for the nice words about the site. The dry blade can absolutely be used to grind ingredients for Chinese herbal medicines. I have seen this done several times. When doing this, your sister should expect the container to take on a “cloudy” effect due to the hard ingredients being thrown against its sides, but the blade assembly should be remain fine.

  104. Pinkaholik says:

    Im excited to say that I’m buying a Vitamix!(finally). But now that I’m comparing models I’m stuck between the 5200, 7500 (never even heard of this model until today)and the 750 being that its new (new sounds nice, but now undecided). I want to get the most for my money would be using it for evrything I can, dry n wet such as soups, ice cream, butters, smoothies, milk etc. Please Help!!

    • bd bd says:

      Pink, all the models you mentioned will do every one of the tasks you desire – as will every single Vitamix model in their entire line. The main differences in the different blenders in the line are size, accessories, and, with some of the latest models, pre-programmed cycles. So, in a nutshell, you will be weighing the added cost of some models against how much added convenience you feel they will give you with some of the newer “bells and whistles.” But make no mistake, every single Vitamix model out there will deliver fantastic results. You will not be able to tell the difference in a green smoothie made from one versus that made from another.

      To your specific question, the 7500 and the Pro 750 are identical blenders, functionally. The color options on each vary slightly and the recipe books will contain a couple different variations depending on which one you choose. The 5200 is still Vitamix’s top-seller and will do everything the others will for a significantly lower price.

  105. Greg says:

    Thank you so much for this great writeup! It’s the best I’ve found on the internet!

  106. Laura says:

    I read all the questions and answers here on your website which were all very informative and helpful. Thank you for making my decision to buy a Vita-mix much easier. I have narrowed it down to two models – it is between the Vita-mix 5200 and the Vita-mix Turbo Blend 4500. It looks like they are the same except for the Turbo Blend only has a low and high speed. Are there any other differences? And why isn’t the Turbo Blend 4500 sold on the Vitamix.com website? Thank you so much for your help!

    • bd bd says:

      Laura, you have pinpointed the main functional difference between the two models. The TurboBlend 4500 comes with a 2.2 peak HP motor but does not have the Variable speed dial which gives the user added flexibility with certain recipes. The only other major difference is the warranty. The 5200 is covered for 7 years. The TurboBlend, 5.

  107. ROBBIE says:

    Aloha BD,
    I just recently bought a Vitamix 6300 and made the Pea Soup that had you cooking a potato, onion, peas in broth on stove to soften for 20 min. and then cool for 15 min. Then put on Soup setting. It seemed like the Soup setting ran for almost 3 minutes which in less than 1 min. it was already pureed. I thought it was too long . . . did it run that much longer just to make it hot? I almost wanted to stop it, would it have been better to just do it manually? Should I return it and stick with a 5200?

    I also want to grind wheat berries to make my own flour, but was told to make it ‘stone ground’ which is better for you than finely ground. How would I be able to accomplish ‘stone ground’ . . . would it be OK to do in the Wet container if doing ‘stone ground’ consistency only? Also, would you recommend just buying the ‘Dry Blade’ only and the wrench and changing the blades myself instead of buying the ‘Dry Blade’ container? Is the container made of a stronger material that won’t scratch as much as the Wet container? I look forward to your reply.

    • bd bd says:

      Robbie, the reason the Vitamix “Soup” setting on the 6300 runs for that length of time is because it is using friction generated by the blades spinning against the ingredients to heat the recipe. You can certainly stop it sooner manually if you desire it less warm, or, likewise, run it for additional time to make the soup even warmer. The 5200 will accomplish this identically except you will always stop the blender, manually.

      The Vitamix “wet” container is suitable for several grinding tasks like peanut butter, oats, sugar, etc. but for the harder grains like corn and wheat berries I would recommend the “dry” container because, over time, subjecting the “wet” container to these harder grains will eventually wear down the blades, creating a need for service or replacement. For the price difference, I would buy a “dry” container rather than purchase a blade assembly and wrench and constantly switch them out. The containers, themselves, are made of the same material.

      To get the “stone ground” consistency you are after you simply have to monitor the grinding. Stop the blender periodically and check the texture until you have it how you want it. Again, you can do this in the “wet” container but it will eventually take its toll on the blades.

      • ROBBIE says:

        Aloha BD, Thank you so much for your quick response. I’ve been watching for your reply but my Internet was down. If I was in the Soup setting and wanted to Stop manually, would that mess up the preprogramed Soup setting?
        The instructions in the book say to run the preprogrammed cycle until it stops, I wasn’t sure if stopping it manually will mess up the computer chip.
        Also, if I were to always stop it manually,should I stay with a 5200 and just do everything manually?
        I look forward to your another great response.

        • bd bd says:

          Robbie, you can stop the machine without damaging the chip. Vitamix recommends you not stop it, though, in order to achieve the desired results per each recipe associated with the specific pre-programmed settings. The recipes have been tested with the settings to provide the best results. Of course, if you plan on using predominantly your own recipes, or if you wish to alter those specific recipes, you may prefer to manually control the blender. If that is the case, the Pro 500 will still do a great job, but you can capture some cost savings by selecting a different model such as the 5200 you mentioned.

          • ROBBIE says:

            OMG BD you are wonderful. Thanks again for the quick response and information/tips you provided. I really appreciate it.

  108. Nancy says:

    I have been reading all the wonderful information on your site, I would like to ask an additional question regarding the 5200 and the 6300. The 5200 has a “High” switch, the 6300 does not, yet it is the same motor…so does that mean that the speed 10 on the 6300 is equivalent to the 10+high on the 5200? I’m trying to determine if you lose the “high” option if purchasing the 6300.

    Thank you for your time and assistance!

    • bd bd says:

      Nancy, your hunch is correct. Variable Speed 10/High on the 6300 is the same speed as High on the 5200. You do not lose the High speed option.

  109. CAS says:

    Hello~ I have an older VM, and when I use it, it sounds like it has a grinding sound (like metal rubbing together) Then when I move the speed to a higher level, it goes back down in speed by itself without the speed knob moving at all. What would you say the problem is here.
    Thank you in advance I truly appreciate it.

    • bd bd says:

      Cas, unfortunately I am not going to be much help to you as I am not an engineer, but it sounds to me like two separate issues that are quite possibly unrelated. I can only advise that you contact customer service at Vitamix and describe what’s happening with your blender. They may be able to give you a repair estimate and you can decide for yourself whether or not it would be worth the investment to get it running normally again, assuming it is no longer covered under warranty. Best of luck!

  110. JC says:

    hello..your website is THE BEST in terms of information on the vitamix! I have 3 questions:

    1) Is the vitamix 5200 made to work on both 50hz and 60hz frequency?

    2) can i buy the 5200 model and use it on 220V 50HZ electricity in Europe via converter?

    3) would the usage via converter impact the performance of the vitamix 5200?

    4)the label on the vitamix 6300 from costco states 120V, 50/60HZ, 11.5 amps. is the 5200 the same?

    5) if i buy refubrished 5200 from the vitamix website for 329$ and purchase a converter to 220V electricity, so that it can work in europe, would the 5200 refubrished work on 220V 50HZ?

    6)would you recommend using vitamix with converter?

    Thank you in advance for your response!!! I look forward to hearing your thoughts…the vitamix sells the 220v via phone but they quote me 739$ and i absolutely cannot afford this price…

    Thank you and look forward to hearing from you!

    • bd bd says:

      Thanks for the nice words, JC. Here are my responses:
      1) Yes.
      2) Probably, yes. But I would consult an electrician over there to be certain.
      3) Probably. How much, I cannot say because I’ve never tried this. It should still work but I would not expect optimum performance.
      4) Yes.
      5) Probably, yes. But I would consult an electrician over there to be certain.
      6) No, for two reasons. First, your warranty on the blender will be voided completely if you elect to do so. Second, I have no first-hand experience doing this so I cannot recommend it with any authority.

    • ad says:

      You are going to want to use a transformer that’s above 3000v. I know that overtime it will ruin your machine. I made the mistake of using an adaptor/converter for my Omega Juicer and ruined it. I’m just glad it wasn’t my Vitamix. So I’m in the market for a 220v Vitamix to use in EU. But have a discussion with your electrician first. =) Good Luck!

  111. Lin Y says:

    I’m hoping you can help me because I can’t find this information anywhere! I bought a Vitamix at Costco numerous years ago – a VM1030. I’m wondering how that compares to the 5200. Is the blade the same. I am wanting to upgrade to the newer container now that I know that the current one has BPA, and I’m wondering if I should replace just the container or the container/blade combo. Orrrrrr, perhaps my VM1030 is outdated and should be replaced entirely???? I want to get the best bang for my buck!

    • bd bd says:

      Lin, if you are referring to the TurboBlend 1300 model then, yes, the blade assembly and container is the same as the one found on the 5200. Any newer container should work just fine on your model. If your current blender still works well, I would not consider purchasing a newer one. Your model may be older but it is certainly not “outdated.” Vitamix blenders are built to last.

  112. Tammy says:

    If I change the ice blade do I have to have the blade compressed in by a machine? My pitcher has oil or grease coming out the bottom but my husband thinks it can’t be replaced without using a special machine to compress part into the pitcher. Have a Christmas party coming up soon – need my blender running properly. Thank you.

    • bd bd says:

      Tammy, if I understand your question you are asking if the blade assembly on your Vitamix can be replaced manually. The answer is yes. The entire assembly can be taken apart and re-installed from the underside of the container. Vitamix makes a special tool that makes this process very simple. It is available on their website as are replacement blade assemblies.

  113. miriam says:

    Can you tell me what the total height is of the 5200 with the 48oz container?

  114. mookie says:

    Hi, congrats on a very informative website. I am looking to buy a Vitamix 5200, but it’s a big decision given the price. I want to make sure that it won’t be outdated anytime soon–do you know when the next model is due to be released? Thanks.

    • bd bd says:

      Mookie, Vitamix does not keep me informed of new model releases in advance. That said, despite a few new models having been issued this past year, the 5200 is not “outdated” nor will it be anytime soon. It is still the flagship model in the Vitamix line and their #1 seller.

  115. Jay Kapman says:

    Is the Vitamix Creations GC the same machine as the 5200? If not what are the differences?

    • bd bd says:

      Jay, the Creations GC has a very slightly more powerful motor – 12.5 amps as opposed to 11.5 on the 5200. Both contain the same containers and user interface on the blenders. The recipe books are very slightly different. The warranty on the 5200 is 7 years, 2 years longer than the warranty on the Creations GC.

  116. WannaBlend says:

    Hey BD,

    I’m about to pull the trigger on a VitaMix. My question: If I’m just planning on fruits and veggies for smoothies and juices, is there any reason I shouldn’t save $50 and purchase the TurboBlend Two Speed instead of the 5200?

    Thanks!

    • bd bd says:

      WB, the TurboBlend will certainly work just fine for smoothies and juices. Personally, I get plenty of use from the Variable speed dial, but it is certainly not mandatory. One other thing to keep in mind is the warranty duration: 7 years for the 5200, 5 for the TurboBlend.

  117. Didi Bradette says:

    How do I buy it – link takes me to the Vitamix website and it’s not at price shown here.

    • bd bd says:

      Didi, when you are taken to the Vitamix website, you select your color and warranty and click “add to cart.” Once you are taken to your shopping cart for checkout you will see the discount has been applied.

  118. Mia says:

    When would I really have to buy a dry blade?

    • bd bd says:

      Mia, I would advise purchasing the dry container if you plan on grinding harder grains like winter wheat or corn. Or, if you plan on doing a lot of grinding of just about anything. Even the “softer” grains will eventually take their toll on the wet blade, but it is fine for occasional grinding of softer grains.

  119. Lisa says:

    Hello! My son is on a gluten free diet and I’ve just found out – he will need to be free from soy too. So I’m looking for an alternative of store bought things which almost always contain soy if they are gluten free. I’ve been reading all your questions/comments and I see that you say that most things can be done with the wet one. I’m thinking of just getting that and seeing how much I use it before purchasing the dry container – can you think of any reason why I should get the dry container? One thing that I’m looking at making is my own Quinoa flour – we bought a measly 16 oz for $7 and it was bitter and the pancakes we made for my son were a total bust. Is that something that I can do with the wet container?

    Thank you!

    • bd bd says:

      Lisa, the Vitamix wet container will grind Quinoa without a problem. If you plan on grinding harder grains – corn for instance – then I would recommend you get the dry container as well.

    • Suzi says:

      Hi,

      I have had my Vitamix Super 5000 for almost 18 years now. I have the dry blade container and 2 wet ones. The dry blade container grinds hard grains (wheat, rice, corn, dry beans, to a much finer and smoother consistency than the wet one. I use it to make bread. I am also getting used to a gluten free diet, and grinding your own is much cheaper and fresher! Plus, it mixes and kneads your dough. I love it.

  120. Jane says:

    Hi, I have been looking at the Vitamix for awhile now and just saw the 6300 demo at Costco. I am not sure what the difference is between the CIA and the 5200. Having not used one of these machines before, I am also not sure how important the pre-sets are on the 6300 and if they’re worth the extra $$$. The reviews on Amazon say they are worth it, but I’m not sure. I also am considering the refurbished unit, but wondering why they only offer 5200 refurbished and not a unit with the pre-sets. I am mostly going to use the machine at home for smoothies, soups, frozen drinks. Regardless it’s a lot to spend on a blender and just wondering which machine to go with. I would very much appreciate your thoughts and recommendations.

    • bd bd says:

      Jane, there is no difference at all in the actual blenders, themselves, between the CIA and the 5200 models. There are only slight differences in the recipe books that come with them. The opinions on the preset functions of the 6300 vary greatly. Some people who have affinities for recipes that have been designed around them like the added convenience of not having to monitor the blender. Others, like myself, prefer to operate the blender manually. I do this regardless of which blender manufacturer/model I’m using because I prefer to control precisely on what speed(s) and how long to blend whatever it is that I’m making. All three of the models you mentioned give me this ability and, to this extent, are essentially the exact same blender.

      There is nothing any of the preset functions can do that you can’t do yourself, manually. You’ll just have to consider whether or not you think the added convenience of not monitoring the blender for certain recipes will be worth the cost upgrade for you and your family. Vitamix sells many more 5200s than they do Pro Series 500 or 6300 models so there are usually enough of this model to keep in inventory without having to constantly advise customers on being “out of stock.”

  121. Lin says:

    OK,I just found your answer to my first question up top. The Costco guy told me that 6300 may last 30 years, and 5200 is about 15 years. And when too much work, 6300 will stop and 5200 will burn…is it true? And did you mean both of them have same amount of noise?
    I am glad I found here. You are really professional.

    • bd bd says:

      Lin, everything about the two models is identical except for the introductory DVD, the preset functions and Pulse switch. There is nothing one model contains that suggests it should “last” longer than the other. How long each will work will depend upon how it is used and cared for. They both come with the identical warranty, also. They are both equally loud.

  122. Lin says:

    I just bought a 6300 from Costco. I was heading for 5200, but the demo guy said 6300 has a new motor, will seize the food down, more quiet, and he also said it can do both wet and dry jobs, so basicallly I saved money for dry container…Based on this, I choosed 6300. However, when I did some homework last night, I am not very sure about those new difference now.. Can you explain a little bit more about the difference with these two styles:
    1) new motor? 2) quiet? 3) both wet and dry? 4)can 5200 heat the soup?
    Thanks.

    • bd bd says:

      Lin, the 6300 model that Costco sells contains the exact same motor and the exact same container (with the same blade assembly) as the 5200. Like the 5200, the “wet” container that comes with the 6300 will do some “dry jobs” but for harder grains the “dry” container is still recommended.

      What the 6300 has that the 5200 does not are some pre-programmed settings that are to be used in conjunction with certain recipes that Vitamix has created. If using these recipes and the corresponding pre-programmed setting, the blender will stop on its own once blending is complete. It also has a Pulse function. With the 5200, the user must stop and pulse the blender manually. The 5200 will do everything the 6300 does, including heating ingredients when making soup.

  123. pomdon says:

    Ok…I am completely new to all of this and want to ask the most basic of questions you may have answered a 100 times already! Can you tell me why juicer websites and fanatics claim to be healthier than blender fans? Juicing claims to be healthier as a person can digest the goodness of fruit and veg easier and the fiber in the core, pith and skins is a disadvantage to this. Blender fans claim the fiber is critical to health and therefore better than juicing. I am teetering on the edge of buying a Vitamix but have seen combined juicers and blenders advertised and wonder if I should go down that road. Please help. I am confused. Thanks for your time .

    • bd bd says:

      Pomdon, the standard claims of both sides have validity. The bottom line, to me, is that both blending and juicing can play an important role in a healthy lifestyle. Fruit and vegetable fiber, alone, is important, and its presence aids in steady nutrient release and absorption into the body’s bloodstream. This is especially important when ingesting fruits that are high in natural sugars, and may be less so regarding vegetables.

      Juicers require more effort to clean and produce more waste in the form of unused fiber, but vegetable juice, especially “green” juice, is great for you. If I could only have one or the other I’d select a high-performance blender. But I am a fan and proponent of both blending and juicing. It is not a right/wrong or good/bad issue to me. They will both benefit you tremendously.

  124. Barb says:

    I believe I have narrowed my search between the pro 300 versus the 5200. The differecnce is jar size that comes with it, slightly larger motor in the 300 and the difference in price (100) but otherwise seems like same machine. Is this accurate? I believe same 7 year warrenty. Am I missing anything? They both would fit any new containers purchased. I am leaning toward the 5200 due to price but its a big investment no matter what you buy so want to be happy

    • bd bd says:

      Barb, everything you have described about the two machines is accurate. The jar size is indeed different, and the blade assembly in the Pro Series 300 is a little larger. The recipe books are very similar but the Pro Series 300 features some restaurant-style recipes. The book that comes with the 5200 focuses on healthy every-day recipes. The good news is you will be happy with either. If you are leaning toward the 5200 due to price then I encourage you to go that way. It is a phenomenal blender.

  125. Elisaveta says:

    Hi Jonathan,
    I came across your site accidentally (but again, there are no accidents) after reading a lot of information about the Vitamix 5200 blender on the internet. I, like everyone else coming to your site with questions about which blender is better than another and why, have to inquire about Vitamix 5200 and Blendtec. I have never used either brand before. The more I read about both on your site and after seeing the video demonstrations, the more confused I am as to which one I should really buy. I was told that the Vitamix is an amazing blender and you too do say that it is. But you also say how great the Blendtec is. It seems like both perform extremely well with the same ingredients you throw in them. So, my question is: for someone like me, who has never use blenders with such great performance and durability, what would you recommend I buy? Vitamix 5200 or Blendtec?
    Originally, I was leaning toward the Vitamix 5200 because I was told by two raw vegans who have experience, that the 5200 is an awesome blender and will blend anything I put in it… but after reading about how great Blendtec is, now i’m stuck again. Also, just a note: I do like that the 5200 is not programmed, but rather I can control the speed/power it runs with.

    Another question: I saw the nut butters you introduced here, but what is your experience with making butter from raw cashews? I have bought and tried before, it is delicious and would definitely want to make it myself when I finally purchase my blender.
    What I will need the blender for is to make smoothies mostly with raw fruits and veggies, and using seeds and nuts incorporated in the smoothies – kale, kiwi, apples, chia seeds, hempseeds, carrots, etc….

    I really appreciate your help and input. :)
    elisaveta

    • bd bd says:

      Elisaveta, I’m sorry the videos left you more confused than ever. My intent was for them to have the opposite effect! Most people who watch the entire series find one or more elements of it that points them toward one blender over the other. Since this did not happen in your case, and since I do not know you, personally, I can only go by your comments in making a recommendation. Your thoughts indicate to me that you seem to be gravitating toward the Vitamix, already. You also have acquaintances you trust who have recommended it to you. Were you to purchase a Blendtec, I feel there is a much higher likelihood that, based on this, you might tend to wonder “what if” regarding the Vitamix if you didn’t select it.

      You also express concern over being “new” to blenders. I consider the tamper that comes with the Vitamix to be a valuable accessory to new and experienced users, alike. There is no question that you will find it worthwhile as you learn to make and develop your smoothie recipes. It also helps tremendously with other functions of the machine such as cashew butter which you intend to try. All this leads me to recommend the Vitamix in your specific situation. You won’t regret it. Good luck!

      • Elisaveta says:

        Jonathan,
        thank you so much for your reply! Yes, you were right that I was leaning toward the Vitamix 5200. I was just looking for an affirmative from you to go ahead and purchase it. Which you did! :)

        I have had other blenders/different brands, but wanted to graduate to buying a better, durable blender that will last me many years; and that is of an industrial “strength”.

        Regarding the tamper that the 5200 comes with? Why is it that the Blendtec does not come with it and the vitamix 5200 does? Is it because the vitamix pitcher is taller and the food can’t get down to the blade, as opposed to the Blendtec, which appears shorter?? With the blenders I use now, a lot of times I have to stop, open the cover and push down the ingredients – so, in a way the tamper will help with that since it can be used while the blender is running?

        Thank you so much for your time! I really appreciate it!
        elisaveta

        • bd bd says:

          Elisaveta, the Blendtec’s blade is of a patented design that has been engineered to create a “votrex” which draws ingredients downward instead of throwing them outward around the blender container like a standard blender might. Thus, they promote the blender as not needing a tamper. The Vitamix blade design also creates a vortex-like effect and indeed you will find you won’t need the tamper for several applications. I consider the tamper a nice “insurance policy.” Best of luck!

  126. Lisa says:

    A vita mix machine was given to me. It came with only a”dry” pitcher. Can I use it for smoothies, soups etc….or just for dry stuff?

    • bd bd says:

      Lisa, I’ve actually never tried this so I can’t give you a definitive answer. What I can tell you is that is will not hurt the container at all to try it for these purposes. And, my guess is that it will probably work well enough. Good luck. If you decide you want a “wet” pitcher to go along with it, you can purchase them separately:

      Vitamix Containers

  127. Devin says:

    I have the option to buy either the vitamix 5200, or the blendtech standard for the same price – which would you choose over easy/quickness of everyday use for thing such a smoothies both thick vs avg textured. Things like butters/hummus are not a concern as I do believe both can do an equally good job. I am looking for the ‘quickest’ use w the highest quality result.

    • bd bd says:

      Devin, both machines are going to deliver excellent smoothies regardless of texture. With the Blendtec you will have to pay closer attention to ingredient ratios and order of loading them into the container. Also, for some recipes with the Blendtec you will have to dedicate a little “trial and error” with manual speeds and/or blend cycles to perfect them.

      In your particular situation I would probably recommend the Vitamix simply because the tamper will enable you to reach your desired results more quickly regardless of the set of ingredients you are using for your smoothies. In researching these blenders you might find several complaints about the tamper from Vitamix owners. However, I consider it to be a very valuable accessory.

      • Devin says:

        Thanks for the input. I have used both in commercial settings before – so I know they both turn out the best blend. I had learned the ‘intuitive’ blendtec correct as you go, which is not a negative, its just funny to hear someone else say it. Thanks I will take your advice into consideration :-)

  128. Amre says:

    Hi. I’ve been toying with buying a Breville Elite. Now Costco has the Vitamix 5200S! Though my idea is to use this for juicing only, it would be great to have more options, should time allow.

    Could you compare/contrast Breville v. Vitamix? If you had the option, which would you choose and why?

    Thanks so much for your time – I appreciate it. :)

    Amre Cortadino

    • bd bd says:

      Amre, if I’m not mistaken the Breville Elite is a juice extractor. The Vitamix will not “extract” juice, it will incorporate the entire fruit or vegetable into your final result. Therefore, it is impossible for me to compare the two as they work entirely differently. The Vitamix is certainly more versatile, but if extracted juice is what you are after, of these two, only the Breville will provide it for you.

  129. Barb says:

    I would like to buy this as a gift for my daughter for x-mas. On the vitamix website they offer the creations 2 and the 5200 compact both are 449.00. The only difference I see is the warrenty both come with the same extras. Wondering is there a difference and what if any pros to one or the other?

    Thanks

    • bd bd says:

      Barb, the motors in both blenders are exactly the same. The 5200 comes with a 64 oz. or 48 oz. container. The Creations II comes with a 48 oz. container. The recipe books are slightly different, also. There are a couple of different color options between the two and, as you have already discovered, the 5200 comes with a warranty that is 2 years longer.

  130. Marcus Wolford says:

    Sorry if this has been addressed or is just obvious:

    What will a food processor do that the vitamix either can’t do or will simply be inferior with?
    - I am thinking about selling my food processor and ice cream maker to buy a reconditioned 5200.

    Thank you BD for your outstanding feedback!

    • bd bd says:

      Marcus, you might find some nut butters – especially the less oily varieties – to be more easily made with your food processor. Also, you will get a much finer and cleaner “dice” with the processor if you are looking for that with your vegetables like, for example, when making a “chunky” salsa. Some people find certain food processors easier to work with in terms of removing the finished product from the container, also.

      • Rosalind Booth says:

        I just ordered the 7500 today…it comes with a 64ounce container that fits under the sink. I’m concerned about difficulty getting thicker mixtures out from around the blades…I can only use one hand…is this a difficulty?

        • bd bd says:

          Rosalind, getting all your recipe out from around and underneath the blades will be no more difficult on the 7500 than any other Vitamix model. Though the blade size on the 7500 is larger than on some other models, its relationship to the size of the container is still roughly the same. My best advice for you is to get a spatula with a very narrow “head” which will allow you to navigate around the blades as easily as possible. These are pretty commonly found, but if you can’t find one elsewhere, Vitamix sells them on their website as well. Best of luck to you.

  131. Barbara says:

    I am going to be utilizing my Vitamix to make almond butter with no additional oils. I have both the wet and dry containers. Which would be best to use for this job?

    Thank you!

    • bd bd says:

      Barbara, either would work well, but since you have the dry container, I would use it. Make sure your almonds are as dry as possible and, after you have formed a paste-like consistency, allow several minutes for the natural oils to release before a final blend.

  132. Nice review. I personally use it all the time and recommend it too all my clients. It does the best job out out of all the blenders I’ve used because it really blends everything well.

  133. Veronica says:

    Hi, I am shopping for my first Vitamix! Would you recommend I purchase the CIA Pro (which I think is the same as the 5200) or the 750, simply because it is the current model?
    I live in an apartment with thin walls. Is the difference in noise level noticeable?
    Thank you!

    • bd bd says:

      Veronica, all Vitamix models are “current” models. It is true that some have been around longer than others, but basically each is designed and/or packaged slightly differently so that it might appeal to a particular customer over the other models. Of the two you mentioned, the CIA Pro is more similar to the 5200. In terms of the blender, itself, they are identical. The Pro Series 750 has a lower profile and a slightly more powerful motor. It is also a little quieter than the CIA Pro. I would say the noise difference is noticeable, but it is still a loud blender.

      Using the information you provided, I would say the Pro 750 is preferable for you, solely because of the “thin walls” in your home. However, there are numerous other factors in your lifestyle that you should take into consideration before making a buying decision – including the price of the blender. All the Vitamix products are great. I am happy to help you select one to the extent that I can. Understand that for anyone, though, my help will be always be limited to that which I know about her/him.

  134. apple says:

    Hi ~ I bought a Vitamix this year and broke tamper by accident.
    Should I buy one separately or can I get one for free? Is there a shipping fee?

    • bd bd says:

      Apple, Vitamix will not repair or replace the tamper as part of the warranty because user error is the only way to destroy one. They sell for $12 and you can find them here:

      Vitamix Accessories

      There is a shipping fee for the tamper. It will appear on the Payment page at checkout.

  135. Rivka says:

    Is the 5200s any diffrent than the regular 5200??

  136. Cheryl says:

    I’ve read that the Vitamix CIA has a metal to metal coupling where the unit sits on the base….is this only on this model or is it on the TNC model as well.Please tell me what are the other differenes between these two models. Thank you

    • bd bd says:

      Cheryl, the drive-shafts on the blade assemblies on both models are metal, but the couplings on the motor bases are made of a strong plastic. The TNC is essentially the same model as the 5200. Vitamix has re-named it for sales in Canada. The only differences between the TNC and the CIA models are the accessory packages that come with them – namely, different recipe books. Both contain the exact same motor and container.

  137. Mel says:

    Hi

    I’m from Australia and am looking over here at the 5200. They are more like $1000 here!!! I know the new jug is BPA free but feel it is only a matter of time for recognition that most plastics are toxic and not a good mix with food. Can I get a stainless jug to fit the 5200? If I found an old one would it fit? I have seen other cheaper blenders with stainless jugs. Someone told me that some other brand jugs are interchangeable also.

    Will they be making a squatter jug for the 5200 because it seems silly to have such a tall jug and also makes it hard to remove sticky foods. I don’t want to buy and then have remorse when they make improvements.

    Thanks

    Melinda

    • bd bd says:

      Melinda, there is no stainless container available for the 5200, and the older stainless containers will not fit on the new models. Vitamix currently has a 48oz. container package available with the 5200 model. They also have a 32oz. container sold separately that will fit any model.

      • Melinda says:

        Thanks for the reply. I was hoping not to have to buy another jug when it already comes with one but being so tall will not work for me. I want to make hummus and cashew cheese and think it will be awkward scraping it from the long sided jug. Bad luck about the stainless. Hopefully vitamix will catch on to that idea like some other companies.

        Melinda

  138. elizabeth genova says:

    I just purchased a barboss advance and wonder if it will make soups and soups like the 5200 – i have another vitamix blending station advance at the office – which we all enjoy and I wanted to have another for my home use but didn’t want to spend a lot of money. Can you tell me what other things I could do with either of those blenders?

    • bd bd says:

      Elizabeth, as you probably know, both the Barboss and Blending Station machines are commercial blenders designed primarily for use in bar and/or restaurant settings. They come with unique blade and container designs as well as pre-programmed settings specifically for common industry uses like frozen drinks, smoothies, milkshakes, etc. The warranties are much shorter than that of the 5200 because of the expected usage of these models.

      I have never personally seen soups made with either of these models. However, like the 5200, the Barboss Advance comes with a very strong 2HP motor. So, with extended blending durations on its highest speed settings I would expect sufficient friction would be generated such that soups are able to be made with it as well. Good luck and let me know how it goes!

  139. Darryl says:

    Just got my Vitamix and almost ready to try a few recipes. My question is regarding how ‘loosely’ fitted the jar is when it is place on the base? ie. There is some movement/wiggle room. Is this normal?

    • bd bd says:

      Darryl, yes, this is perfectly normal. In fact, during blending you will almost always notice the container rotate about 1/4″ until it rests comfortably against the posts extending from the motor base.

  140. Marilyn says:

    Thanks for all the great info. I am considering a 5200 or a “Pro” series, but can’t find any comparisons. What is the difference between the various Pro models (200, 300, etc.)? How do they differ from the 5200?
    thanks again!

    • bd bd says:

      Marilyn, both the Pro 300 and 750 are built with a lower profile, meaning, they have a 64oz. container that is shorter and wider than the standard container that comes with the 5200. The total height of the 300 and 750 is 17 1/4″, so it is possible that these models will fit on countertops underneath many upper kitchen cabinets. These two models also have a slightly stronger motor – 2.2 HP as opposed to 2 HP with the 5200. The power difference is negligible but noise is also slightly reduced due to the design of the fan inside the motor base. The 750 comes with some pre-programmed settings designed for specific recipes. The 300 does not. These allow the user to start the blender without having to stop it – the blender will do so automatically.

      The Pro 500 has the exact same motor and container as the 5200, but comes with some pre-programmed cycles as well. All 3 of the Professional Series models are significantly more expensive than the base 5200 package – something else to keep in mind.

  141. Pamela says:

    I, too, purchased a Vitamix yesterday at Costco after spending a lot of time at the in-store event. It is a Vitamix 6300. I cannot find this model on the Vitamix website, or anywhere else, for that matter. Costco offers a 5200 model online, but not this one. What exactly did I get? Which one is considered a higher-featured machine? I notice the 5200 online offer includes a dry foods container for the same price. In my reading, I noticed there is a new, quieter motor available and it is featured in the 750 model, presently carried exclusively by Williams Sonoma. That sounds good to me…or is it a lighter-powered motor? I am looking for the best value for the money, and am now a bit confused. Thank you!

    • bd bd says:

      Pamela, the Vitamix model that you purchased at Costco is essentially a Professional Series 500, renamed specifically for Costco. It contains the exact same motor and container as the 5200. It has 3 pre-programmed settings that will automatically stop when blending is complete. It is a great blender but, as you discoverd, is significantly more expensive than the 5200.

      The Professional Series 750 is offerred at Williams Sonoma but not exclusively. It is also available from all authorized affiliates, including this site. It contains a 2.2 HP motor which is not “lighter-powered” but has been designed to be very slightly quieter than the Pro 500 and similar models. It also is the most expensive of the blenders in the Vitamix home line. It is tough to say which is the best value for the money. They are all superb blenders and all will last many, many years. For value, with one of the 5200 packages you can get several additional accessories for a price similar to the Professional Series models. Also, the least expensive option is the Factory-Reconditioned Vitamix.

  142. jim says:

    Based on your informative comments and answers to questions re Vitamix 5200, I’m considering purchasing the unit for home use to liquefy leafy greens, vegetables, fruits and also to grind various hard grains. You mentioned that the wet blade could be dulled by hard grains. Does Vitamix have a separate dry grinding accessory that you recommend?

    Is the 5200 unit your choice for medium to heavy home use or do you recommend another version?

    Thanks.

    Jim

  143. Kelly says:

    Hello.

    This may be a silly question but Im gonna ask it anyway. I looking at purchasing a Vitamix 5200 Here in Australia. However I am heading to the USA in October for a holiday and was thinking about purchasing the DRY Jug over there as its cheaper than Oz. Will this still fit the machine that is designed for 240 volts?
    thanks appreciate your reply

    • bd bd says:

      Kelly, I’ve never used one of Vitamix’s 220/240v machines. That said, if it is a 5200, I’m certain the dry container you purchase in the U.S. will work with it.

  144. Johnny says:

    Are the Vitamix machines universal? Will a new jar fit on an older model?

    • bd bd says:

      Johnny, it depends. If you have a Vitamix 5000 model, the new containers will fit. This was the model that was introduced in the 1990s and was produced until 2007. Prior to that model, a different container was used. A new container will work on any Vitamix model produced since 2007, also.

  145. Sharon says:

    Hi…In a previous post you said that the recoditioned models had a 7-year warranty. I went to the link below and it states it is a 5-year warranty.

    Factory-Reconditioned Blender with 48oz Container

    • bd bd says:

      Sharon, recently Vitamix did, in fact, change the warranty term on the factory-reconditioned blenders from 7 years to 5. However, they also lowered the price by around $20. Still a very good deal with a 5-year warranty.

  146. Brenda says:

    I have a Vita-Mix 5000. It has begun to leak from the underside of the pitcher, only. I placed it on a paper towel and the liquid is a dark brown. I purchased it from a thrift store, so I have No warranty. What do you suggest?

    • bd bd says:

      Brenda, The 5000 model was discontinued in 2007 so your blender is 5 years old at a minimum and possibly much older. Your best option is probably going to be just getting a new container. The containers for the new 5200 models will work on your blender.

  147. Lucian says:

    What is the difference between the Vita Prep and 5200 ?
    Are they the same machine ? same motor and lid ?
    Or the VitaPrep il an older model ? than 5200 ?

    • bd bd says:

      Lucian, the lids and containers on the two machines are the same, but the motors are not. The Vita Prep comes with a 3hp motor and a stronger cooling fan. It is designed for constant, repetative use such as in a restaurant setting. Because of this, the warranty is less than half that of the 5200 – 3 years as opposed to 7.

  148. Katemari says:

    Reconditioned or not, that is the question.
    I finally decided to get a Vitamix, but I’m torn between getting a new one for $450 or a reconditioned for $330. It’s a considerable difference but one comes with 7 years warranty, the other 5 years “only”. In addition, the reconditioned can only be bought on the website. If something goes wrong and I decide to return it or need to send it back, then I have to pay shipping for it. If I buy a “new” unit in store I can just go back there and return.

    I don’t think I will want or have to return it though, and my main thing, I guess, is whether the reconditioned units are really reliable and worth the savings.

    Can you help me with that?

    Thank you!

    • bd bd says:

      Katemari, I am a fan of the reconditioned blenders. In my years as a demonstrator I personally saw the condition of many units that were returned and would go on to be re-sold as “reconditioned.” Many were practically new, having been only used a couple of times, if at all. Each unit is factory re-inspected and comes with a brand new container. The new units do come with a longer warranty and, of course, you’d be the only one to have ever used it. There is a peace of mind that comes with that. But I have never been notified by a customer of a complaint with the reconditioned units.

  149. lisa mitchell says:

    Hello,
    Thanks for all the helpful info. I have tried calling Vitamix Customer Service a number of times but can’t get anyone live.
    What is the best way to turn off the machine. Do I just turn it to off from the high setting or go back to variable and power down from 10 to 1 as I did to start it up.
    Thank you!

    • bd bd says:

      Lisa, you definitely want to start the machine with the Variable setting on Speed 1. However, feel free to go from High to Off at any time to stop blending. You do not have to first turn the Variable back to Speed 1, although it is perfectly fine to do so.

  150. Jamie says:

    Hi Blender dude

    My husband bought me a Vita Mix 5200 about 2.5 years ago .. I use it quite a bit for protein shakes and smoothies… now all of the sudden it sounds different and there is a burning smell coming from it.. it seems as if maybe the bottom part of the pitcher is rubbing and isnt turning as well as it should… should it be oiled or is there something else wrong with it?

    • bd bd says:

      Jamie, it could be a problem with the blade assembly or something to do with the motor. You do not have to lubricate any part of the machine, but, short of seeing it, myself, I’m not going to be of much help. The good news is your 5200 is well within its warranty and Vitamix has great customer service. They will be happy to diagnose and repair it for you. Contact them asap!

  151. Joni says:

    Whats the best way to get sticky foods like punt butter and hummus out of the container without too much waste? Thanks! This site has been very helpful.

    • bd bd says:

      Joni, for hummus and other dips, unfortunately, there is no secret other than using the common spatula. Just have patience and take your time getting every bit out you can. You would do the same for nut butters. However, one of my readers had a great recommendation for butters – after using the spatula to remove all you can, make a smoothie that calls for the nut butter you just made as one of the ingredients. This way, you won’t waste any!

  152. marge says:

    i have been very dissapointed trying to get help when I call vitamix. I have called several lunch breaks while at work and each time the wait is longer than my break allows. i can not take that much time out to keep waiting on hold. do you know what has happened at their company – did they get rid of much of their sales force or something? i honestly am giving up with them and am probably going to buy a ninja or blendtech or something.

    • bd bd says:

      Marge, Vitamix has experienced some production problems this spring/summer that has limited their inventory of new 5200s. However, I’m not sure how that translates into longer hold times when calling them. For years I have touted their superior customer service – it has literally been the best in the business – and I have never experienced a significant hold time when calling them. I’m sorry for your experience. I know that must be frustrating.

  153. Paul says:

    Trying to decide between the vitamix 5200 and vitamix pro series 500. I would end up getting either with one set of wet and the dry blades. it looks like the only difference (besides cook books and accessories that come with each) in the blenders are the presets and the full power dial on the 500. Given that the 5200 costs a good deal less, wondering what you think simply about differences in performance (the quality of what you make, or things you can or can not make) provided by those presets and that full power dial? Thanks for your site – and for the clarity of your writing!

    • bd bd says:

      Paul, both Vitamix blenders are awesome – and you’ve pretty much nailed down the differences between the two. The motors inside both are identical, so the performance differences will be nonexistent. The preset functions are certainly nice, but, in my opinion, do not warrant the price difference in the two Vitamix models you reference. If money were no object I would probably choose the Pro 500. The 5200 is the better bang for the buck, however.

  154. yellow flower says:

    How loud is this Vitamix 5200. I need something that is as quiet as I can get because of a disease I have. How many decibels is it? What would you compare the noise to? People talking in a library? A train? A jackhammer? An HP Printer? I will be using ice with it and I know that ice makes it louder, but just how much? If there is a quieter one on the market, please let me know! This is the first feature I need and I’ll shop from there. I’ve just heard a lot of good things about this. Thanks.

    • bd bd says:

      YF, the 5200 is loud, as you would expect from most blenders. I have never taken a decibel reading, myself, though I have seen some reported here and there across the web. I have no idea as to their credibility. I would equate the noise on the “High” speed to a hair dryer also on the “High” setting. Maybe even slightly louder. Of course, as you already suspect, a lot depends on the ingredients you are using. That said, the lower speed you use on the 5200 the quieter it gets. The low speeds are substantially quieter. With ice, though, you’ll opt for the higher speeds.

      The newest (and most expensive) Vitamix on the market is the Professional Series 750. As far as I know, it is currently only available through Williams-Sonoma and comes with a price tag of nearly $700.*** However, it is advertised as being 40% quieter than the models currently on the market. If this is indeed the case, the noise level should be more than manageable. Best of luck!

      ***Edit. The Pro 750 is now available online through Vitamix and its authorized affiliates.

  155. dd dabuba says:

    I’m looking for a good multi-purpose blender & food processor.

    1) I’ve been looking at different version of the 5200 machine, to figure out what the diff is between the $450 and $650 models. I don’t see any difference other than jar options and accessories. Am I correct that all of the 5200 blender bases are exactly the same blender, and the one reason for buy one vs the other is the type(s) of jars you want and the set of accessories you want???

    If I’m wrong, explain what the differences are. Its confusing because they describe one model as the “gourmet” model, and another as the “complete kitchen” model, but they do a poor job of explaining actual differences in capabilities that are not associated with the jars.

    2) Is there a better model than the 5200 series, other than the fact that jars & accessories might be different? Does a “creations” model make me more creative? Does a “professional” model provide a greater range of functionality in the kitchen?

    Or is it all just marketing and choices of jars & accessories?

    • bd bd says:

      DD, great questions – and you’ve pretty much already figured out the answers. Yes, the motor bases in nearly all the Vitamix models designed for home use contain the exact same 11.5 amp, 1380 watt motor. The differences in the “packages” are primarily the accessory options. Some contain more/different containers, different recipe collections, and even different warranty lengths. Sometimes a new “line” is created specifically for a certain affiliation Vitamix makes (for instance, with the CIA). If you search hard enough on the Vitamix website you can distinguish between the packages, but, I agree, it can be troublesome/confusing.

      On certain models there is an added function capability or two – for instance, the pre-programmed settings on the Professional 500. And others contain fewer functions (just a High/Low toggle with no “Variable” speed dial). The most important thing to remember is that, regardless of the model you choose, you will be getting pretty much the same phenomenal blender and awesome Vitamix customer service. How creative you get, or “professional” you appear will be completely up to you. ;-)

  156. Camille says:

    Hi blender dude,
    Your website and 5 part series of YouTube videos are awesome. I was tossing up between buying the blendtec and vitamix also. I finally bought the vitamix thanks to your videos. The only problem I’ve experienced so far is that I really want to grind almonds and seeds into flour or meal and I keep getting almost a butter like consistency. They become sticky. Can you give me some tips. I actually bought the dry jug also hoping that this would help.
    Thanks
    Camille

    • bd bd says:

      Camille, thanks for the nice words about the website and videos, and congratulations on your Vitamix purchase. All nuts that you grind in the blender will eventually turn to butter if you let them. The key when you desire a flour consistency is, therefore, to limit the amount of grinding time. The best way to accomplish this is to grind smaller quantities at a time. Try again with fewer almonds, covering the blade assembly by perhaps no more than an inch. Grind on “High” for a few seconds at a time, stopping to check for the consistency you desire.

      You may have to make multiple “batches” this way depending upon how much flour you need for any given recipe. With practice you should be able to gradually increase both the amount of almonds you use as well as the blending duration between “stops.” Best of luck!

  157. Daniel says:

    I’m looking to buy the 5200 compact version but am wondering if acquiring the dry container is necessary for what I plan to do: make coconut butter from shredded coconut; pumpkin butter from pumpkin puree and coconut butter; a mixture of avocado, banana, and coconut oil; a mixture of nut flour, hemp seeds, vanilla, sea salt, cocoa powder, and sugar. Basically butters and batters…

    • bd bd says:

      Daniel, based on your described uses for the Vitamix, you absolutely will NOT need to purchase a dry-blade container. The standard container will work perfectly for all those functions. Good luck!

  158. Mike H says:

    I broke my Vitamix 1st day I had it.
    I had soaked beans overnight and put them into my new Vitamix 5200 blender and the motor stopped and let of an electrical burned smell.

    The motor would not restart.
    I don’t know why.
    The beans were soaked and moist.

    I packaged it up and brought it right back to the retailer, Whole Foods.

    Shocked and disappointed.

    • bd bd says:

      Mike, my guess is that the thickness and quantity of the beans caused the “overload” function of the Vitamix to activate in this instance. When this happens, the blender may take up to 8 hours to sufficiently cool the wiring before it will allow you to re-start it. I’m sorry for your experience. I haven’t personally ever experienced this with soaked beans in the Vitamix.

  159. Brooke says:

    Please Help! I have a vitamix vita-prep and each time I use it it leaks out of the bottom of the pitcher….I have checked different sites looking for parts that should be replaced regarding this problem but have not been able to find any information. Could it be that I have a seal missing or a part broken?

    • bd bd says:

      Brooke, It is very possible you have a damaged seal or other part. The first thing I would do is check to see if your warranty is still valid. The warranty on the Vita Prep is not as long or comprehensive as that of the 5200. However, your issue might very well be covered if the warranty hasn’t elapsed. Vitamix used to provide links to purchase various parts but now only provides them for entire containers and other accessories. However, they may still sell individual parts if you can determine what, exactly, is wrong with your container. Your best bet is to call the commercial division, 800-437-4654. Best of luck.

  160. jedo says:

    Each blender offers something I want.. not fair! :p

    I have a bamix hand blender, but its “blender container” is too small so I’m looking to make the following
    – sun flower seed butter
    – quick evening soups
    – almond meal and milk
    – coconut milk and flour
    – occasional power smoothie

    I strongly prefer the manual control of the vitamix, the fact that my mom has had hers for 20 years, and with the 48oz container, countertop space is no longer an issue.

    But the blendtec’s easier reaching in make cleanup easier, and with the new twister, seems to be easier to make nut butters. And I’m ridiculously lazy.

    The choice is mine. And at least I have one :)

    • bd bd says:

      Jedo, you certainly seem to have considered all the important factors. The good news is I’m sure you’ll be pleased with whichever you choose. Good luck!

  161. Linda says:

    How do I actually use the wrench to disassemble the vitamix 5200 for cleaning or changing blade?

    I cannot find instructions so far.

    • bd bd says:

      Linda, place the container on a towel or non-slip surface, bottom side up. Place the tool over (around) the nut and turn counterclockwise until you feel it loosen. Then finish loosening the nut by hand and the blade assembly will slide right out.

  162. Linda says:

    I’ve had my vitamix for at least 5 years and love it. Use it daily for smoothies, have made a soup in it once but like pots better for soups. Do you agree that loading soft items first and ice last is important to avoid overloading or stoppage of the unit. Always starts right back up. I recently bought the wrench thinking it was to take the bottom off to clean it but see now it must just be for changing blades, etc.

    Great machine. Now it’s about time for a juicer too though I like the pulp for fiber in smoothies.

    • bd bd says:

      Linda, thanks for sharing your success with the Vitamix! I always recommend loading the softer items first – it’s easier on the machine and helps create the vortex that draws the more solid ingredients into the blade. Of course, with the tamper you could get away with loading the jar any way you want.

      The wrench is intended to be used primarily for changing the blade assembly. I don’t recommend taking the blades out just for cleaning. Constantly loosening and tightening the assembly could possibly make the seal more prone to leaks.

      Juicers are great but use it as a supplement to blending, not as a replacement!

  163. Nachelle says:

    Which is better, the Ninja or Vitamix?

    • bd bd says:

      Nachelle, the short answer to your question is simply this: the Vitamix is a far superior blender. That said, it is also much more expensive than the Ninja. I have used a Ninja before and, for the money, it is not a bad machine at all. But it simply doesn’t compare in terms of quality or performance to a Vitamix.

  164. Yuri says:

    My Vitamix did not come in the standard box. Meaning it came in a brown shipping box loose in there. I have goggled and asked around and the people I have asked have said their Vitmaix came in 2 boxes. One being the standard box were the blender comes in and then the brown box, which is used to ship. It was also assembled already. Is that the norm? Second underneath my Vitamix pitcher there is a greenish film. Is that a seal that is supposed to be there? I would really appreciate the help. Thanks

    • bd bd says:

      Yuri, I’m sorry for your unpleasant experience. In my experience I have never heard of the Vitamix being shipped in anything other than normal Vitamix packaging. The only explanation I can come up with is that perhaps you ordered a reconditioned unit. If so, they may have chosen to package it a different way, but you can rest assured that it is covered under warranty exactly as a new unit would be. If you ordered a new machine, it definitely should not have come pre-assembled (assuming you mean the jar already on top of the base). Regardless of your circumstance, I would definitely CALL Vitamix. They have excellent customer service and will almost certainly give you a clear explanation and/or do whatever it takes to make you a satisfied customer. Good luck – please let us know how it goes.

  165. Susie says:

    Hey there. Perhaps I have overlooked a major detail in the reviews, but please outline details of how challenging the cleaning of the vitamix vs blendtec compare. I know myself well enough to know I will grow frustrated if the clean up is a hassle.
    Thanks so much!

    • bd bd says:

      Susie, here are the two passages from the respective reviews where I mention cleaning. Both blenders are fairly easy to clean, and with smoothies, ice creams, and soups, etc., the Vitamix is no more challenging to clean than is the Blendtec. With certain thicker recipes like hummus or nut butters, removing contents from the Vitamix jar prior to cleaning is a little more difficult because of its blade design, but cleaning is done the same way and may only take minimal hand-wiping of the blades afterward.

      “After most blending operations, cleaning the container of the 5200 is a simple procedure. Simply filling the container approximately halfway (4 cups), adding a small amount of liquid dishwashing detergent, and running the machine on the High setting for 30 seconds to 1 minute is all that’s required. It is possible to hand wash the jar as well, but attention must be paid to the blades as they are relatively sharp. It is recommended that the container not be cleaned in dishwashers.”

      “The Pulse button operates just as one would imagine. It will run at a medium-high speed for only as long as it is held depressed. Short bursts are great for chopping ingredients instead of pureeing. Longer durations can be used for anything from cleaning the jar with soap and water to incorporating a forgotten or additional ingredient to making a smoothie outright.”

      • sneadly says:

        I have run the blender with soap and water to clean it, but that sometimes leaves a little goo under the blades. A bottle brush does the trick: keeps fingers safe and saves a little electricity.

  166. vince says:

    I have a barboss vitamix blender yes i know its good for smoothies .Can i akso make soup and how coz I have the vitaprep jug is there a possibility to make soup on this machine can u please help me out .also can u send me some recipe just for start latter I will try to purchase the recipe book

    • bd bd says:

      Vince, I have used the Barboss several times but, as you would imagine, I used it for frozen beverages. I would think the different blade assembly would still work for soups – you just have to let the machine run long enough to create the necessary friction. The motor in your machine has the same power as the 5200. If using a pre-programmed cycle select the one that spins the longest duration on the highest speed. You may have to repeat the cycle several times to get it as hot as you want it. Otherwise just select the highest possible speed and let it blend.

      There are a few soup recipes on the Recipe page of this site. Just scroll down a little. Best of luck!

      • vince says:

        how true is that 5200 and bar boss have the same hp motor .since barboss has a timer is it ok to spin the barboss for a longer time

        • bd bd says:

          Vince, both blenders have the same motor – 11.5 Amps, roughly 2 HP. The programmed settings on the Barboss are designed for perfect blending with specific – frozen, mainly – ingredients. They aren’t designed that way for “protecting” the blenders, so to speak. So, yes, feel free to run the Barboss for additional time if you feel it’s necessary.

  167. Wilhelm H says:

    Very informative. I am leaning towards buying a Vitamix. One of my favorite “smoothies” involves lime juice, ice and tequila. I’ve noticed on another website that there seems to be a special set of blades designed for ice. Is this true? If so, are they that much better than the standard blades? And how easy is it to switch back and forth? Thanks!

    • bd bd says:

      Wilhelm, that’s one of my favorite “smoothies,” too. ;-) I’m not sure to which website you’re referring, but the Vitamix does not come with set of blades designed just for ice. With the exception of hard grains (rice, wheat, corn, etc.), for which you would need a separate container with different blades which would turn those grains into flours, everything else you do in the Vitamix, including frozen drinks, is done with the standard “wet blade” container. No need to buy different blades for those special smoothies of yours.

  168. Cynthia Wilson says:

    Hi, I’m so glad you offer this service as I am confused. :)

    I just watched a Ninja 100 TV commercial and the dough making is impressive. I get that for $160 it won’t last as long. It makes me curious though about the instructions I read on how to make bread in the vitamix (which I really want to buy regardless of cost). How much trouble is it? Can I make a loaf in the 48 oz. jar?

    Also, I won’t grind my own wheat, but will grind flax seeds. Do I really need the extra jar @ $100 (costco) or $144 (online)? Would an inexpensive spice/coffee grinder work for the seeds? I plan to put them in the juice I’ll make.

    And last, since I want the 48oz. jar, I will buy the reconditioned. What can you tell me about that?

    Again, I sincerely appreciate your information as this is a major purchase for me.

    Blessings,
    Cynthia

    • bd bd says:

      Cynthia, these are all good questions. It really is not much trouble at all making dough in the Vitamix. The entire process will take just a few minutes for a 1 lb. dough ball. I’ve never made it in the 48oz. container but, based on its size in the 64 oz. jar, I think it could be done with little problem. If you only plan to grind flax seeds I would not recommend you invest in the “dry” jar. The “wet” blade will work perfectly fine on flax, although over extended time you run the risk of prematurely dulling the blades (you’d have to grind an awful lot of flax to do this). To avoid this, however, your other idea is a good one. An inexpensive coffee grinder will work perfectly on flax seeds.

      Vitamix used to only offer the 64 oz. jar in the reconditioned package but they currently have the 48 oz. container as well. It contains the exact same motor-base. The jar, obviously, holds less, and doesn’t have the ergonomic soft-grip handle. However, it is the ideal height to fit underneath countertops, which many people like. The container and tamper are new and it carries a full 7-year warranty.

      Factory-Reconditioned Vitamix with 48oz. Container

      Best of luck in your decision and let me know if I can help further.

      • Cynthia Wilson says:

        Thank you Jonathan!
        Now I’m wondering about the VM vs. the Blentec. I am new to this way of eating/drinking and I’ve read VM has the ‘healthier culture’, recipes, etc. behind it which is a plus for me. My main objective is increased vitality and better overall health. Then again, the Blendtec info reads like it’s easier, and for me, ease of use means I’ll actually use it! I’ve just began eating organic foods and with either one of these it seems I’ll get more from what I’m buying.
        It seems you represent both companies, but considering the above, what do you think might be best for me? (Sorry, but right now my computer isn’t letting me view the demos.)
        Thanks agan,
        Cynthia

        • bd bd says:

          Cynthia, the majority of both Blendtec and Vitamix owners bought their machines to practice a healthier lifestyle. It is certainly possible with both. There is really nothing that one machine can/will do that the other won’t. In general, the VItamix recipe-book probably does contain the greater number of “healthy” recipes but I wouldn’t make that a huge part of my buying decision, as you can make anything in either blender and healthy recipes are abundant on the internet.

          I wouldn’t necessarily say that the Blendtec is “easier” to use than the Vitamix, either. It is just different. For certain recipes, it can be. For others, it isn’t. The Blendtec is smaller and very slightly stronger. The Vitamix is plenty strong, however, and comes with a tamper that many people dislike but I feel adds an element of “control” that the Blendtec doesn’t. If you were only going to use the recipes that came with either Blender, the Blendtec is probably easier to operate because of its pre-programmed cycles. If you plan on venturing outside the recipe books, though, you might find the Vitamix easier to use, especially at first. But the differences are numerous- it’s really a shame that you can’t watch the videos – I made them especially for people like you trying to decide between the two. At the very least I suggest you read the comments I made for each video. Also, if you read the reviews I have of both on this site perhaps they can provide some insight into one of the other that might steer you toward a certain model. Here are the links:

          Vitamix Review
          Blendtec Review

          Short of watching the videos, my advice is to read as much as you can on both, and then continue to ask questions as you have them.

  169. Rosa says:

    PLEASE HELP!! I recently bought a Vitamix 5200 and have not yet taken it out of the box because I have now seen the Health Master ad and it seems like it’s just as good. I’ve called and asked questions to both companies, I’ve compared and overall, it seems It might be worth sending back the Vitamix. I mean, overall I’d be repocketing about $250.

    They both have a 2 horsepower motor. I’m getting 8 yr. warranty, great customer service, hasslefree (They’ve already even sent me the return labels–which I have not yet utilized). The Healthmaster has a lifetime on the motor and I can purchase a 6 year warranty for 30 $$$ on it. I DON’T KNOW. PLEASE TELL ME SOMETHING NEGATIVE ABOUT THE HEALTHMASTER SO THAT I WON’T BUY IT INSTEAD FOR THE INCREDIBLE PRICE OF $179.95 plus $30 (for 6 year warranty) plus $49 for extra jar (I need) plus maybe another $10 for additional cards–though it comes with so much more recipes than Vitamix and totally adds up to less than the $484.?? That I just paid. Please help me!!!! Thanks!

  170. billy smart says:

    I don’t seem to see you having any mention of the Barboss Advance or other Advance blenders from Vitamix. What’s up with that?

    • bd bd says:

      Billy, the Barboss Advance is a great machine but is more commonly sold as a commercial blender, carrying a significantly shorter warranty. My reviews are geared toward the home consumer who wants to take advantage of the Vitamix technology and receive maximum warranty coverage, which is exactly what the 5200 does. That said, I do have significant experience with the Barboss so if you have specific questions about it I would be happy to answer them for you.

  171. Peter says:

    Hi,

    I have a question regarding jar in a Vitamix and Blendtec. They are made from plastic. does it get scratch, is there any smell coming out of them after washing or cooking soups in them I have some thoughts about toxicity getting into food using it for soups…??

    • bd bd says:

      Peter, excellent questions. These are all legitimate concerns. The jars in both the Vitamix and Blendtec used to be made out of polycarbonate. Although durable, they did tend to scratch and “cloud up” relatively easily. But the use of this material was necessary, though, because of the extreme torque applied during blending. Glass jars simply would not hold up.

      Today, the containers for both blenders are made of much more durable co-polyesters. They are significantly more resistant to scratching and clouding than the previous models. However, over time you will still notice these effects in both containers, especially if you constantly expose them to frozen ingredients and/or hard grains – when making flours, for example. The extent of the scratching or clouding really is commensurate with usage.

      Very few recipes will leave behind odors in these jars, but it is possible. The heating of certain ingredients, like soups, for example, might do this. If present at all, these odors would be very minor. In my experience, after cleaning, adding more water with just a drop of bleach will almost certainly eliminate any such odors. To address your final concern, the co-polyester used in the containers in both blenders is now BPA-free. BPA (Bisphenol A) is the toxic compound used in some plastics that is/was of utmost concern as far as leaching into foods goes. It is now a non-issue with these containers.

  172. JayDee S says:

    I just bought a Vitamix at Costco, though when I went into the store I had no intention of buying one! I had thought I could use a blender, but when I saw the demonstration I was hooked particularly by the health benefits the Vitamix can provide. Afterwards, I got nervous about spending so much money, but your article has helped relieve my conscience! Thanks.

    • bd bd says:

      Jaydee, those health benefits you mention are the #1 reason people buy the Vitamix in my experience. You have a great machine. Congrats on your purchase.

  173. 5200 Vitamix fan says:

    Great Information, thanks! I’m thinking of teaching a food prep class using the Vitamix 5200 pretty soon.

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